RC regions and inventory issues

Update: March 31st: The Lab hopes to have a fix deployed to all three RC channels on Wednesday, April 1st. In terms of the problems related to disabling the HTTP Inventory option, which this fix does not address (see BUG-8917), the Lab notes that going forward, users should keep this option enabled, otherwise issues of load failure will occur. As such, it is anticipated this option will be hidden from general view within the viewer at some point in the future. 

The server-side deployment to the three release candidate channels (Bluesteel, LeTigre and Magnum) during week #13 included updates focused on reducing instances of inventory loss, and also included some server-side code clean-up. Unfortunately it also brought with it the potential to create a few inventory-related issues.

The problems are reported in BUG-8877, and have the potential to affect anyone running a version of a viewer that does not have the recent AIS v3 updates (e.g. the current release of Firestorm and, I believe, Singularity), and / or any viewer with or without AIS v3 updates which is running with HTTP Inventory disabled. However, they will only occur when you are actually located on an RC channel region, and then only in situations described below.

You can ascertain whether or not you are on an RC region via the viewer’s Help > About floater.

You can tell whether or not you are on a simulator RC channel via your viewer's Help > About floater. If you are currently on a region running on the Main (SLS) channel the viewer will report "Second Life Server", followed by the version number. If you are on an RC channel, the viewer will report "Second Life RC" followed by the channel name (Magnum, Bluesteel or LeTigre) and version number
You can tell whether or not you are on a simulator RC channel via your viewer’s Help > About floater. If you are currently on a region running on the Main (SLS) channel the viewer will report “Second Life Server”, followed by the version number. If you are on an RC channel, the viewer will report “Second Life RC” followed by the channel name (Magnum, Bluesteel or LeTigre) and version number. The problems noted here will only occur on RC regions (click to enlarge, if required)

There are two problems which are being encountered:

  • If you empty Trash and relog when using a viewer without the AIS v3 code updates (e.g. the current release of Firestorm), the purged items will reappear in Trash the next time you log-in to SL. This will not happen if you are running a viewer with the AIS v3 updates – your Trash will purge and remain empty, as expected
  • If you are running the viewer with HTTP Inventory disabled, and clear cache, your inventory will not fetch as long as you remain on an RC channel region, leaving you a cloud (see below). This will happen regardless of whether you are running a viewer with or without the AIS v3 code updates
One of the current RC issues: If you have HTTP Inventory DISABLED (see the unchecked item in the Develop menu) and then clear your cache in an RC region, on relogging, you'll find your inventory will fail to fetch
One of the current RC issues: If you have HTTP Inventory DISABLED (see the unchecked item in the Develop menu) and then clear your cache in an RC region, on relogging, you’ll find your inventory will fail to fetch

Until such time as the server-side code has been updated, these issues can be overcome / avoided by:

  • Moving to any non-RC region to purge Trash properly without items returning following a relog
  • Re-enabling HTTP inventory in your viewer (CTRL-ALT-Q to display the Develop menu, if required, and then checking HTTP Inventory), and then relogging to overcome issues of inventory fetching following a cache clearance when on an RC region.

The JIRA reporting the issues has been imported by the Lab for an immediate fix. This probably means – subject to confirmation from the Lab – that the code currently on the RC channels will not be promoted to the Main (SLS) channel on Tuesday, March 31st, and that a fix will (hopefully) be deployed to the RC channels on Wednesday April 1st. I’ll have an update in my usual SL project update reports in due course.

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The Drax Files 28: art and SL as cathartic renewal

“You know, when you first asked me to do the Drax Files, I said no,” Whiskey Monday states at the start of segment #28 of The Drax Files World Makers. I doubt anyone watching the show regrets her decision to actually go ahead and appear on the show.

Whiskey is well known throughout Second Life for her incredible artwork, which started with her single frame stories. Her work is thought-provoking, intelligent, evocative, mischievous, fun, pointed, and more – and all of it is certainly some of the finest expressions of art as a medium for social and general commentary I’ve ever seen. It’s also deeply personal, much of it reflecting on Whiskey’s real life; usually in a frank, honest way free from pathos while laying bare her mindset and emotions.

Whiskey Monday at work
Whiskey Monday at work

It is on this latter aspect of her work that the show primarily focuses on, in what is once again one of the most compelling pieces of video journalism I’ve seen in a long while, with Drax almost completely absent from the piece and leaving Whiskey to tell her story in her own words. As such, what is delivered is an incredible journey through Whiskey’s lives (plural intentional) which allows us to witness first-hand how Second Life can be a platform for emotional release, self-expression and cathartic renewal in our lives, as well as a place where creative investment brings additional rewards which help spur us on.

“I have been going through a really difficult personal life the past few years,” Whiskey says just after he opening comment on the video. “And I have used Second Life as a medium to express my frustration with the real world; depression; my issues with my mother; my issues with my sister. It helped me get through those times, Drax. and I couldn’t do that as my physical identity.”

Whiskey's work is intensely personal, but also strikes many assorted chords for those who see it
Whiskey’s work is intensely personal, but also strikes many assorted chords for those who see it

This is an incredibly powerful, open, and honest statement to make; a baring of the soul that requires a huge amount of honesty and trust. That Whiskey is prepared to speak so freely  about matters is itself testament to the degree to which her creativity through Second Life has been cathartic for her.

Through the video, we get to share in Whiskey’s creative process, travelling with her from an initial idea, through to the completed image, with Whiskey describing each step of the journey in creating what are highly personal images. It’s a remarkable and painstaking process, as she honestly admits she’s not that comfortable with Photoshop, and so strives very hard to achieve as much of the finished piece in-world as she possibly can – something which itself speaks to the incredible creative power found within SL, either directly through the tools provided by the viewer, or via scripted tools and systems provided by other users.

Whiskey's most recent exhibition, entitled  Recently, was the debut exhibition for the new– Dathúil gallery run by Max Butoh (see my review here)
Whiskey’s most recent exhibition, entitled Recently, was the debut exhibition for the new Dathúil gallery run by Max Butoh (see my review here)

Framing her images so precisely obviously requires the execution of a high level of control in terms of the subject matter and how the observer sees it. It’s a level of control Whiskey is very aware of; it’s also something that, given the context of her art, might be too easily dismissed as manipulating the audience.

Yet Whiskey makes no apology for this – and nor should she. She certainly isn’t the first artist to manipulate the environment (virtual or real) to focus the audience’s attention and direct their emotional responses; artists do it all the time be it through the initial framing of their shot or via cropping and editing after the fact, or through extensive post-processing. In fact, I’d argue that Whiskey is entirely right in the level of control she exercises – although I’d perhaps refer to it as compositional direction. At the end of the day, these images are her stories, and as the narrator, she has the right to shape the manner in which they are told.

What’s more, it makes her work all the more striking to those who witness it, as it more than likely strikes a far more personal chord within us than might otherwise be the case; hence why Whiskey also tries to leave the images as open-ended in interpretation as possible.

Continue reading “The Drax Files 28: art and SL as cathartic renewal”

2015 viewer release summaries: week 13

Updates for the week ending: Sunday, March 29th, 2015

This summary is published every Monday, and is a list of SL viewer / client releases (official and TPV) made during the previous week. When reading it, please note:

  • It is based on my Current Viewer Releases Page, a list of all Second Life viewers and clients that are in popular use (and of which I am aware), and which are recognised as adhering to the TPV Policy. This page includes comprehensive links to download pages, blog notes, release notes, etc., as well as links to any / all reviews of specific viewers / clients made within this blog
  • By its nature, this summary presented here will always be in arrears, please refer to the Current Viewer Release Page for more up-to-date information.

Official LL Viewers

  • Current Release version updated to version 3.7.26.299635 on March 24th (formerly the Avatar Hover Height viewer) download page, release notes, wiki page, AHH overview
  • Release channel cohorts (See my notes on manually installing RC viewer versions if you wish to install any release candidate(s) yourself):
    • No updates
  • Project viewers:
    • Avatar Layer limits project viewer, version 3.7.26.299805, released on March 25th – allows users to wear up to 60 wearable layers (jackets, shirts, tattoo, alpha, etc.) in any combination  (download and release notes)

LL Viewer Resources

Third-party Viewers

V3-style

  • Black Dragon updated to version 2.4.2 Beta on March 23rd, and then to version 2.4.2 on March 29th – core updates: volumetric light fall-off; multi-line chat; Avatar hover Height, bug fixes (change log)
  • Restrained Love Viewer updated to version 2.9.7 on March 26th – core updates: RLV fixes and Avatar Hover Height inclusion (release notes)
  • UKanDo updated to version  3.7.24.28080 on March 24th – core updates: Avatar Hover Height inclusion, RLV updates, nips and tweaks (release notes)

V1-style

  • Cool VL Viewer Experimental branch updated to version 1.26.13.5 on March 28th – core update: global wearables limit (release notes)

Mobile / Other Clients

  • No updates.

Additional TPV Resources

Related Links

Space Sunday: nitrogen nibbles

CuriosityCuriosity, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, resumed operations on Mars resumed operations on March 11th 2015, after an electrical short circuit in the rover’s robot arm caused a suspension of activities while the matter was investigated, and short itself having triggered the rover to switch to a “safe” mode to prevent any potential damage.

The short, was not enough to damage the rover’s electrical systems in any way, occurred occurred when the was attempting to transfer samples of material gathered from a rock dubbed “Telegraph Peak” from the drill head to the CHIMRA system by subjecting the entire turret to rapid vibrations from the drills percussion action. Extensive tests were carried out over 10 days to try to determine if the short was transient, or indicative of a potential fault. Only one test during this time caused a further short, which lasted around 1/100th of the second, and didn’t interrupt the drill motor.

The results of the tests gave engineers a high degree of confidence that the short wasn’t indicative of the major fault developing, and so operations recommenced on March 11th with the transfer of some of the “Telegraph Peak” material being delivered to the rover’s on-board laboratory while analysis of the results from the tests carried out on the drill mechanism continue to be examined.

Walkabout and onwards drive: an overlay showing Curiosity’s meanderings through the “Pahrump Hills” area at the base of “Mount Sharp” from September 2014 through March 2015. The rover is now proceeding further upwards along the slopes of “Mount Sharp”, and will use the valley dubbed “Artist’s Drive” to reach its next destination

As Curiosity now heads on up the slopes of “Mount Sharp”, aiming to pass through a shallow valley dubbed “Artist’s Drive”, NASA  has confirmed that the rover has found “biologically useful nitrogen” on Mars.

Nitrogen is essential for all known forms of life, since it is used in the building blocks of larger molecules like DNA and RNA, which encode the genetic instructions for life, and proteins, which are used to build structures like hair and nails, and to speed up or regulate chemical reactions. On Earth and Mars, however, atmospheric nitrogen is locked up as nitrogen gas (N2) – two atoms of nitrogen bound together so strongly that they do not react easily with other molecules; they have to become “fixed” (separated) in order to participate in the chemical reactions needed for life.

On Earth, certain organisms are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen and this process is critical for metabolic activity. However, smaller amounts of nitrogen can also be fixed by energetic events like lightning strikes.

An updated version of Curiosty's "selfie" from February 2013, when the rover was examining the rock dubbed "John Klein".  The original image rendered a "fishbowl" look; in this revised image, the background has been flatened and rendered as seen from a single point in the camera's field of view, while the view of Curiosity is made up of a number of images captured by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI)
An updated version of Curiosity’s “selfie” from February 2013, when the rover was examining the rock dubbed “John Klein”. The original image rendered a “fishbowl” look; in this revised image, the background has been flatenned and rendered as seen from a single point in the camera’s field of view, while the view of Curiosity is made up of a number of images captured by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) – image: NASA / JPL

While Nitrogen has long been known to exist on Mars, a study by the NASA team supporting the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard the rover reveals that NO3, a nitrogen atom bound to three oxygen atoms and a source of “fixed” nuitrogen  has been found in numerous samples gathered by the rover during its journey across Gale Crater.

Although the report’s authors make it clear that there is no evidence to suggest that the fixed nitrogen molecules they’ve discovered were created by life. The confirmation that NO3 does exist adds significant weight to the potential for Mars once having the kind of environment and building blocks needed by life. This is particularly relevant, given that one of the areas in which the NO3 was identified is the “Yellowknife Bay” area, which Curiosity examined in early 2013, and which was shown to have once had a very benign environment for life processes, complete with water, many of the right chemicals, and a local source of energy. This prompted Jennifer Stern of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre in Greenbelt, Maryland, and a co-author f the report to note, “Had life been there, it would have been able to use this nitrogen.”

However, it is more likely that the fixed nitrogen that has been discovered may have been generated primarily by the numerous powerful impacts that occurred about 4 billion years ago, during a period known as the Late Heavy Bombardment, when the inner planets of the solar system were “hoovering up” the remaining debris of asteroids and rock scattered across their orbits.  That said, “fixed” nitrogen has also been detected high in the modern day Martian atmosphere by Europe’s Mars Express.  What’s missing at the moment is the capability to get a big enough nitrate signal for any nitrogen isotope data which might exist, as none of the experiments on Mars are broad enough to do so, thus this is likely to be something future missions to Mars will consider.

Continue reading “Space Sunday: nitrogen nibbles”