A little more Shakespeare in Second Life

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

A Midsummer’s Night Dream Events

One of William Shakespeare’s most popular comedies, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a four-stranded play set within a forest inhabited by the fairy folk under the rule of Titania and Oberon. There is the over-arching theme of the forthcoming wedding of Duke Theseus of Athens and Hippolyta, the Amazon queen, due to take place within the forest. This is to be in part celebrated by a group of six amateur actors staging a play, and who have also come to the forest to prepare. Then there are the four young Athenians who are to be among the guests at the wedding: Hermia, is in love with Lysander, but has been order by Egeus, her face to wed Demetrius, who is deeply loved by Helena, Hermia’s best friend – but whom he dumped to be free to wed Hermia.

Within the forest, Oberon and Titania are somewhat estranged over Titania’s refusal to accede to Oberon’s demand to hand him her Indian changeling. Angered by her actions, Oberon summon Robin “Puck” Goodfellow, his “shrewd and knavish sprite”, with the intent of putting into motion a plan to shame Titania into doing as he wishes through the use of a magical potion. However, as the plot is put into motion, Oberon witnesses assorted actions: the cruel words of Demetrius to Helena, the assery (a deliberately chosen term in the circumstances 🙂 ) of Nick Bottom, one of the amateur players, and the plot inevitably thickens – helped in no small part by a slight case of mistaken identities, until the fairies are forced to convince those with whom they have interacted have just experienced a dream – and Puck suggests that the dream might even extend to the audience.

Seanchai Library continue to celebrate this popular comedy throughout the week with a series of special events:

Saturday, June 22nd, 19:00 The Listening Picnic

Grab a “sammich” and the hand of a friend, and come hang out in Ceilliuradh Glen to celebrate the beginning of summer with a dream or two! Broadcast will be on Stream.

Tuesday, June 25th, 19:00: Making Scenes at A Midsummer’s Night Dream

With Kayden Oconnell and friends at the A Midsummer’s Night Dream installation on LEA 2.

 

A Midsummer’s Night Dream, LEA 2

Wednesday, June 26th, 19:00: A Midsummer’s Night Dream – The Whole Story

With Shandon Loring at the A Midsummer’s Night Dream installation on LEA 2.

The Rest Of The Week at Seanchai Library

Sunday, June 23rd, 18:00: James and the Giant Peach

Caledonia Skytower reads Roald Dahl’s classic at the Magicland Golden Horseshoe.

Monday, June 24th 19:00: Incident at Hawk’s Hill

Gyro Muggins reads naturalist and historian Allan W. Eckert’s popular novel.

In 1870, Manitoba became the fifth province of the (then) three-year-old Canadian Confederation. Over the previous 18 months, it had seen strife and rebellion, but for William MacDonald, his wife, Esther, and their family, the lands around what would eventually become the city of Winnipeg, are ideal for farming, and so they have settled and built Hawk’s Hill.

The open spaces are perfect for the MacDonald’s four children – or should have been; while the three elder children thrived, the youngest, six-year-old Ben, became increasingly introverted.

Small for his age, Ben was reserved and prefers being with animals, learning to imitate the sounds of many, and well as copying their movements and actions. In return, the local animals seem to respond well to him – although members of his family and the other locals consider him odd.

But then came the day when Ben, in seeking new animals to mimic, wandered further than was usual, venturing into unfamiliar territory – only to become hopelessly lost. When a storm breaks, he has no option but to hide in a badger hole – an occupied badger hole. And thus begins a relationship spanning several months between young boy and a female badger, to the benefit and comfort of both.

Thursday, June 27th

  • 19:00: Monsters and Myths: Shandon Loring continues Bernard Evslin’s words on Hecate, variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.
  • 21:00: Seanchai Late Night: contemporary fantasy and science fiction with Finn Zeddmore.
Advertisements

Shakespeare, boys and badgers, and lunar tourists

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, June 16th, 13:00 A Midsummer’s Night Dream

Selected scenes presented live from the current A Midsummer Night’s Dream Project.

One of William Shakespeare’s most popular comedies, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a four-stranded play set within a forest inhabited by the fairy folk under the rule of Titania and Oberon. There is the over-arching theme of the forthcoming wedding of Duke Theseus of Athens and Hippolyta, the Amazon queen, due to take place within the forest. This is to be in part celebrated by a group of six amateur actors staging a play, and who have also come to the forest to prepare. Then there are the four young Athenians who are to be among the guests at the wedding: Hermia, is in love with Lysander, but has been order by Egeus, her face to wed Demetrius, who is deeply loved by Helena, Hermia’s best friend – but whom he dumped to be free to wed Hermia.

Within the forest, Oberon and Titania are somewhat estranged over Titania’s refusal to accede to Oberon’s demand to hand him her Indian changeling. Angered by her actions, Oberon summon Robin “Puck” Goodfellow, his “shrewd and knavish sprite”, with the intent of putting into motion a plan to shame Titania into doing as he wishes through the use of a magical potion. However, as the plot is put into motion, Oberon witnesses assorted actions: the cruel words of Demetrius to Helena, the assery (a deliberately chosen term in the circumstances 🙂 ) of Nick Bottom, one of the amateur players, and the plot inevitably thickens – helped in no small part by a slight case of mistaken identities, until the fairies are forced to convince those with whom they have interacted have just experienced a dream – and Puck suggests that the dream might even extend to the audience.

A Midsummer’s Night Dream, LEA 2

Hosted by Elrik Merlin and Caledonia Skytower, with performances organised by Kayden Oconnell, the cast comprises Caledonia, Kayden, Da5id Abbot, Fayleen Belois, Ian Quintessa, and Aoife Lorefield, the project’s creator, who will also be interviewed after the performances.

If you cannot attend the event, then why not listen wherever you are, in-world or out, by tuning into fantasy.radioriel.org.

Monday, June 17th 19:00: Incident at Hawk’s Hill

Gyro Muggins reads naturalist and historian Allan W. Eckert’s popular novel.

In 1870, Manitoba became the fifth province of the (then) three-year-old Canadian Confederation. Over the previous 18 months, it had seen strife and rebellion, but for William MacDonald, his wife, Esther, and their family, the lands around what would eventually become the city of Winnipeg, are ideal for farming, and so they have settled and built Hawk’s Hill.

The open spaces are perfect for the MacDonald’s four children – or should have been; while the three elder children thrived, the youngest, six-year-old Ben, became increasingly introverted.

Small for his age, Ben was reserved and prefers being with animals, learning to imitate the sounds of many, and well as copying their movements and actions. In return, the local animals seem to respond well to him – although members of his family and the other locals consider him odd.

But then came the day when Ben, in seeking new animals to mimic, wandered further than was usual, venturing into unfamiliar territory – only to become hopelessly lost. When a storm breaks, he has no option but to hide in a badger hole – an occupied badger hole. And thus begins a relationship spanning several months between young boy and a female badger, to the benefit and comfort of both.

Tuesday, June 18th 19:00: The Penderwicks in Spring

Springtime is finally arriving on Gardam Street, and there are surprises in store for each member of the family. Some surprises are just wonderful, like neighbour Nick Geiger coming home from war. And some are ridiculous, like Batty’s new dog-walking business. Batty is saving up her dog-walking money for an extra-special surprise for her family, which she plans to present on her upcoming birthday. But when some unwelcome surprises make themselves known, the best-laid plans fall apart.

Filled with all the heart, hilarity, and charm that has come to define this beloved clan, The Penderwicks in Spring is about fun and family and friends (and dogs), and what happens when you bring what’s hidden into the bright light of the spring sun.

With Caledonia Skytower.

Wednesday, June 19th 19:00: The Menace from Earth

Young love is often hard on those experiencing it for the first time.

Take 15-year-old Holly, for example. A lunar colonist and aspiring starship designer, who has something of a crush on her closest male friend, Jeff, with whom she shares a particular passion: that of flying.

It’s a popular pastime on the Moon, thanks in part to the 1/6 gravity environment. Taking advantage of this in caverns within the cities where the air pressure can be kept high enough, locals can strap on sets of wings and take to the air. And Holly and Jeff are both fans of the activity.

Another element to life on the Moon is that of tourism: playing host to “groundhogs”, as the locals call them, who like to visit the Moon. One such tourist is Ariel, a glamorous woman to whom Holly is assigned to as a guide.

It all goes well to start with – until Holly introduces Ariel to Jeff. To her dismay, Holly find herself facing The Menace From Earth: Jeff is quite smitten with Ariel. As her jealousy grow, so Holly starts to resent Ariel more and more – but what to do?

Things take a sudden turn when Ariel asks to joins Holly and Jeff flying in the local cavern…

With Derry McMahon, Bear Silvershade, and Caledonia Skytower.

Thursday, June 20th 19:00: Monsters and Myths

Shandon Loring re-opens Bernard Evslin’s work of stories featuring the gods, heroes and monsters of Greek mythology, turning to Evslin’s words on Hecate, variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.

Cars, boys and animals, and words on the Moon

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, June 9th, 18:30 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

Caledonia continues Ian Flemming’s classic children’s tale Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang: the Magical Car from the Golden Horseshoe.

Monday, June 10th 19:00: Incident at Hawk’s Hill

Gyro Muggins reads naturalist and historian Allan W. Eckert’s popular novel.

In 1870, Manitoba became the fifth province of the (then) three-year-old Canadian Confederation. Over the previous 18 months, it had seen strife and rebellion, but for William MacDonald, his wife, Esther, and their family, the lands around what would eventually become the city of Winnipeg, are ideal for farming, and so they have settled and built Hawk’s Hill.

The open spaces are perfect for the MacDonald’s four children – or should have been; while the three elder children thrived, the youngest, six-year-old Ben, became increasingly introverted.

Small for his age, Ben was reserved and prefers being with animals, learning to imitate the sounds of many, and well as copying their movements and actions. In return, the local animals seem to respond well to him – although members of his family and the other locals consider him odd.

But then came the day when Ben, in seeking new animals to mimic, wandered further than was usual, venturing into unfamiliar territory – only to become hopelessly lost. When a storm breaks, he has no option but to hide in a badger hole – an occupied badger hole. And thus begins a relationship spanning several months between young boy and a female badger, to the benefit and comfort of both.

Tuesday, June 11th 19:00: Crenshaw

In her first novel after winning the Newbery Medal, Katherine Applegate delivers an unforgettable and magical story about family, friendship, and resilience.

Jackson’s parents are in serious financial trouble; their stressful circumstances are taking a toll on Jackson. Mum and dad remain cheerful and upbeat, putting on a happy face for their kids, but Jackson is not fooled. He knows times are bad and, whether he likes it or not, Crenshaw the giant cat is here to help him through the worst of it.

Crenshaw is not only very large, he’s both outspoken and imaginary. He has come back into Jackson’s life to help him. But is an imaginary feline enough to save Jackson and his family from losing everything?

Author Katherine Applegate proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary.

With Caledonia Skytower.

Wednesday, June 12th 19:00: TBA

Check the Seanchai Library website for update.

Thursday, June 13th 19:00: Howling at the Moon

Stories and Poetry of a Lunar Nature with Caledonia at A Midsummer Night’s Dream at LEA 2.

Detectives, a lost boy, and secret lives in Second Life

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, June 2nd, 13:30: Tea-Time at Baker Street

Tea-time at Baker Street returns with the opening of The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, the final set of twelve Sherlock Holmes short stories first published in the Strand Magazine between October 1921 and April 1927.

This week: The Adventure of the Illustrious Client.

The year is 1902, and Sir James Damery visits Holmes and Watson on behalf of his mysterious and illustrious client. The latter never actually directly revealed to the reader, although it might well be the king himself.

Damery’s client is concerned about the relationship between Violet de Merville, daughter of General de Merville, and Baron Adelbert Gruner, from Austria. Gruner is viewed as a rogue and a sadist and – in Damery’s and Holmes’ opinion – a murderer.

Despite the matter of his last wife’s mysterious death and his reputation, Violet de Merville will not be dissuaded from her determination to marry Gruner. So secure is the latter in his position that he is unfazed by a visit from Holmes – indeed, he warns the latter that a French agent who once confronted him with similar accusations finished-up a cripple for life after receiving a beating from thugs shortly afterwards; a veiled threat if ever there was one.

So, lacking obvious proof, how do Holmes and Watson prevent Violet de Merville from marrying Gruner and possibly facing the same future as the Baron’s last wife?

WithDa5id Abbot, Savannah Blindside, Kayden Oconnell, and Caledonia Skytower.

Monday, June 3rd 19:00: Incident at Hawk’s Hill

Gyro Muggins reads naturalist and historian Allan W. Eckert’s popular novel.

In 1870, Manitoba became the fifth province of the (then) three-year-old Canadian Confederation. Over the previous 18 months, it had seen strife and rebellion, but for William MacDonald, his wife, Esther, and their family, the lands around what would eventually become the city of Winnipeg, are ideal for farming, and so they have settled and built Hawk’s Hill.

The open spaces are perfect for the MacDonald’s four children – or should have been; while the three elder children thrived, the youngest, six-year-old Ben, became increasingly introverted.

Small for his age, Ben was reserved and prefers being with animals, learning to imitate the sounds of many, and well as copying their movements and actions. In return, the local animals seem to respond well to him – although members of his family and the other locals consider him odd.

But then came the day when Ben, in seeking new animals to mimic, wandered further than was usual, venturing into unfamiliar territory – only to become hopelessly lost. When a storm breaks, he has no option but to hide in a badger hole – an occupied badger hole. And thus begins a relationship spanning several months between young boy and a female badger, to the benefit and comfort of both.

Tuesday, June 4th  19:00: Crenshaw

In her first novel after winning the Newbery Medal, Katherine Applegate delivers an unforgettable and magical story about family, friendship, and resilience.

Jackson’s parents are in serious financial trouble; their stressful circumstances are taking a toll on Jackson. Mum and dad remain cheerful and upbeat, putting on a happy face for their kids, but Jackson is not fooled. He knows times are bad and, whether he likes it or not, Crenshaw the giant cat is here to help him through the worst of it.

Crenshaw is not only very large, he’s both outspoken and imaginary. He has come back into Jackson’s life to help him. But is an imaginary feline enough to save Jackson and his family from losing everything?

Author Katherine Applegate proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary.

With Caledonia Skytower.

Wednesday, June 5th 19:00: A Thurber Salute

James Thurber

James Grover Thurber (December 8th, 1894 – November 2nd, 1961) was an American cartoonist, author, humorist, journalist, playwright, and celebrated wit. His work as a humorist and cartoonist celebrated ordinary people as they faced the more comedic eccentricities and frustrations of everyday life.

Published primarily in the The New Yorker magazine, his cartoon and short stories were popular enough to garner reprinting as collections. This success spurred him on to write for the stage, co-penning the Broadway comedy The Male Animal, which was adapted as a a 1942 film starring Henry Fonda and Olivia de Havilland.

Despite being also entirely blind in his later years, the combined long-term result of an accident at the age of seven, when his brother shot him in the eye with an arrow, and failing eyesight in his remaining eye, the last 20 years of Thurber’s life were his most prolific in terms of writing. His output ranged from books to short stories to some 75 fables, and a biography – that of the founder/publisher of The New Yorker, Harold Ross – and a five-party treatise on the American radio soap opera.

For this event, Kayden Oconnell and Caledonia Skytower read selections from three of Thurber’s most popular short stories. The first is The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, written in 1939 and which is perhaps most famously associated with the 1947 film of the same name starring Danny Kaye, Virginia Mayo and Boris Karloff (there was also a 2013 film adaptation, but no-one betters Danny Kaye…). Also on offer are selections from his 1937 short, The Macbeth Murder Mystery, and his alternate history parody from 1935,  If Grant Had Been Drinking at Appomattox.

Thursday, June 6th 19:00: Thor The Mighty Adapted by Elizabeth Rudnick

Asgard’s greatest warrior, the mighty Thor, has vowed to protect the mortals of Earth with his legendary hammer Mjolnireven from his trickster brother, Loki!

With Shandon Loring. (Also in Kitely grid.kitely.com:8002:SEANCHAI).

Submarines, invisible cats and podcasts in Second Life

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, May 26th, 13:30: Tea-Time at Baker Street

Tea-time at Baker Street returns and opens the covers of His Last Bow.

A 1917 anthology of previously published Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the volume originally comprised seven stories published by The Strand Magazine between 1908 and 1917. However, later editions of the book saw an eighth story included, The Adventure of the Cardboard Box, originally published in 1892. This week sees Holmes and Watson engaged upon The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans.

Despite his frequent appearances in various television series depicting the life and times of Sherlock Holmes, Mycroft Holmes only appears, or is mentioned, in just four of Conan Dyole’s tales, this being one of them – actually the one which marked his final appearance in the original canon.

The adventure starts when Mycroft visits Holmes about missing submarine plans and a dead man. The latter is Arthur Cadogan West, formerly a young clerk in a government office at the Woolwich Royal Arsenal, who was found dead next to the London Underground tracks near Aldgate tube station, his head apparently crushed by a passing train. The plans for the Bruce-Partington submarine were found on his body – with three pages missing. Mycroft’s concern is that they’ve been taken by enemies of the Crown.

Not only is there the mystery of the missing pages for the submarine plans, there is much about Arthur Cadogan West’s death which does not add-up; why, for example, was he carrying top-secret plans about his person while apparently due to visit the theatre with his fiancée? Why is there no Underground ticket about his body? Did he manage to travel the service without a ticket, or did someone take it? If the latter, why?

Holmes responds to his brother’s request for help on behalf of the British government – noting to Watson along the way that Mycroft actually is the British government – and thus the adventure begins.

With Da5id Abbot, Elrik Merlin, Kayden Oconnell, and Caledonia Skytower.

Monday, May 27th 19:00: Paper Mage

Gyro Muggins concludes Leah R. Cutter’s 2003 début novel.

Set in the Tang Dynasty of the Middle Kingdom (about the time of Charlemagne in Europe), the novel tells us of the adventures of Xiao Yen, a young woman training to become a paper mage, a sorcerer with the power to endow folded creations with the semblance of life.

Because her gifts are in demand for the protection they can offer, Xiao Yen must leave behind her beloved family and their village home and embark on a dangerous mission when she is hired to protect a caravan. Yet even as she departs, she has no idea that this looming adventure will shape the very woman she is to become.

The story follows two timelines, alternating chapters between the caravan journey, where one of her fellow travellers is a goddess who charges her with a dangerous quest, and the story of her childhood training, when she lay caught between her aunt’s plans and her mother’s plans to have her married off.

Tuesday, May 28th  19:00: Crenshaw

In her first novel after winning the Newbery Medal, Katherine Applegate delivers an unforgettable and magical story about family, friendship, and resilience.

Jackson’s parents are in serious financial trouble; their stressful circumstances are taking a toll on Jackson. Mum and dad remain cheerful and upbeat, putting on a happy face for their kids, but Jackson is not fooled. He knows times are bad and, whether he likes it or not, Crenshaw the giant cat is here to help him through the worst of it.

Crenshaw is not only very large, he’s both outspoken and imaginary. He has come back into Jackson’s life to help him. But is an imaginary feline enough to save Jackson and his family from losing everything?

Author Katherine Applegate proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary.

With Caledonia Skytower.

Wednesday, May 29th 19:00: 14 Years of 100-word Stories

Story writer, story-teller, commentator, raconteur – Crap Mariner is all of these, and more. On May 31st, 2005, after being inspired by both a friend and Woody Allen to write 100-word stories  – or “dabbles” – Crap created the 100-word Story podcast, promising to write a story a day until the day he dies.

Fourteen years on, Crap is still writing  – and still reading his stories in what is quite probably the longest-running daily podcast of original material in the world.

Seanchai Library is therefore delighted to host the 14th anniversary of the 100-word story podcast, with Crap reading more of his stories, which will cover a wide range of topics, just like his podcasts. There might even be a George the Pirate story or two 🙂 .

Thursday, May 30th

19:00: Thor The Mighty Adapted by Elizabeth Rudnick

Asgard’s greatest warrior, the mighty Thor, has vowed to protect the mortals of Earth with his legendary hammer Mjolnireven from his trickster brother, Loki!

With Shandon Loring. (Also in Kitely grid.kitely.com:8002:SEANCHAI).

21:00: Seanchai Late Night

Contemporary Sci-Fi Fantasy from such on-line ‘zines as Lightspeed, Escape Pod and Clakesworld. With Finn Zeddmore.

Saki’s satire, magic and mystery, and prehistoric tales

Seanchai Library

It’s time to highlight another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, May 19th

13:30: The Lighter Side

A young H.H. Munro aka Saki

“Spring is sprung, the grass is riz” as the old verse goes – and many of us even know where the birdies is (quite a few of them outside my bedroom wind joyfully getting into tune at 4:30am in preparation for greeting the sun when it makes rises over the horizon!). So, with this in mind, Seanchai Library is taking a break from mysteries and murders, and leaving the crowded noise streets around 221B Baker Street behind.

Instead, Da5id Abbot, Savannah Blindside, and Caledonia Skytower, it a dive into the works of Hector Hugh Munro (aka Saki), the 19th – early 20th century English satirist and playwright, best known for his witty, mischievous and sometimes macabre stories poked wry fun at Edwardian society and culture.

Initially working as a journalist, H.H. Munro started to write his historical study The Rise of the Russian Empire in the 1890s. However, work on that was slow-going, so he turned to short stories as a means of earning his keep and hit immediate success with Dogged (1899) and a couple of political pieces. This led him to a political satire partnership with illustrator Francis Carruthers Gould and his first use of the pseudonym Saki with The Westminster Alice. Taking its lead from Alice in Wonderland, this series of vignettes poked fun at leading political figures in the UK, and was well-received (and many of his descriptions of politicians still hold true today: “Have you ever seen an Ineptitude?” his Alice asks in describing Arthur Balfour, the then British Prime Minister – to which many of us today could probably say, “sadly yes, the House of Commons appears to be a shelter for Ineptitudes….”, but I digress!).

For this session the Seanchai Library team present a garden buffet of Saki’s tales, including:

  • The Remoulding of Groby Lington.
  • The Match-Maker.
  • Hermann the Irascible – A Story of the Great Weep.
  • Mrs. Packletide’s Tiger.
  • The Stampeding of Lady Bastable.
  • The Sex That Doesn’t Shop.

18:00 Magicland Storytime

Caledonia continues Ian Flemming’s classic children’s tale Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang: the Magical Car from the Golden Horseshoe.

Monday, May 20th 19:00: Paper Mage

Gyro Muggins reads Leah R. Cutter’s 2003 début novel.

Set in the Tang Dynasty of the Middle Kingdom (about the time of Charlemagne in Europe), the novel tells us of the adventures of Xiao Yen, a young woman training to become a paper mage, a sorcerer with the power to endow folded creations with the semblance of life.

Because her gifts are in demand for the protection they can offer, Xiao Yen must leave behind her beloved family and their village home and embark on a dangerous mission when she is hired to protect a caravan. Yet even as she departs, she has no idea that this looming adventure will shape the very woman she is to become.

The story follows two timelines, alternating chapters between the caravan journey, where one of her fellow travellers is a goddess who charges her with a dangerous quest, and the story of her childhood training, when she lay caught between her aunt’s plans and her mother’s plans to have her married off.

Tuesday, May 21st  19:00: Kaleidoscope

When a brilliant young violinist dies in a horrific accident, Madame Karitska has only to hold the victim’s instrument in her hands to perceive the shocking truth. But when an insecure wife asks whether her husband will abandon her to join a sinister cult, Madame Karitska–as wise as she is lovely–chooses not to reveal all that she foresees. And when an attaché case is suddenly dropped into her lap by a man fleeing a crowded subway, she knows it’s time to consult her good friend Detective-Lieutenant Pruden.

A nine-year-old accused of murder, a man dying a slow death by witchcraft– for the hunted and the haunted, Madame Karitska’s shabby downtown apartment becomes a haven, where brilliant patterns of violence, greed, passion, and strange obsessions mix and disintegrate with stunning, kaleidoscopic beauty.

With Caledonia Skytower.

Wednesday, May 22nd 19:00: TBA

Check the Seanchai Library website for updates.

Thursday, May 23rd 19:00: Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Cave Girl

Waldo Emerson Smith-Jones was not overly courageous. He had been reared among surroundings of culture plus and ultra-intellectuality in the exclusive Back Bay home of his ancestors. He had been taught to look with contempt upon all that savoured of muscular superiority, such things were gross, brutal, primitive. It had been a giant intellect only that he had craved, he and a fond mother, and their wishes had been fulfilled. At twenty-one Waldo was an animated encyclopaedia, and about as muscular as a real one.

And so we are introduced to Mr. Smith-Jones, the unlikely hero of this novel, set within Burroughs’ Lost World series. Swept overboard during a during a South Seas voyage intended to ease his ill-health, Waldo finds himself carried ashore on a primitive jungle island, where all his book learning can’t help him survive, particularly in the face of the terrifying ape-like throwbacks to mankind’s early evolutionary history who live on the island, and from whom he continually flees.

And then he encounters – rescues, even, albeit mistakenly – Nadara, the titular cave girl. Regarding him a hero, she teaches him the arts of survival and her primitive language, taking him back to her tribe – who turn out to be Palaeolithic cave people. If he is to stay among them, Waldo must prove his worth by fighting the strongest. He opts to flee instead.

However, as he spend more time in the jungle, gaining in strength thanks to Nadara’s teachings, he finds himself unable to put her out of his mind. So much so that when a ship finds the island, he refuses passage aboard her. Instead, more sure of himself than at any point in his life, he sets out to find the cave girl who believes he saved her.

With Shandon Loring. (Also in Kitely grid.kitely.com:8002:SEANCHAI).