There be pirates at Seanchai Library in Second Life!

The Pirate Docks await the pleasure of your company for Pirate Sunday!

It’s time to kick-off another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

It is International Talk Like A Pirate Day on Tuesday, September 19th, ARRRR! And Seanchai Library is marking the event with a week of salty tales and more!

Sunday, September 17th: Pirate Sunday!

13:00: PIRATE TALES

Take the teleport up to Seanchai Library’s pirate cove, where Kayden Oconnell, Aoife Lorefield, and Caledonia Skytower will regale you with tales of the skull and crossbones, cutlasses, treasure and more from the wild days of yore on the high seas!

14:30-16:30: MUSIC AND DANCE

Those enjoying the tales are invited to teleport down to The Pavilion at Holly Kai Park, which has been specially transformed into the Pirate Docks, where the music will flow for two hours and everyone (and their friends! Invite the all!) can dance the time away, quaff the grog, walk the decks (or plank!), shiver their timbers – and even fire off a cannon or two!

And if have a boat, why not sail over and enjoy the fun!

Pirate Sunday benefits Feed a Smile, supporting a school in Kenya founded and run by Brique Topaz 16 years ago through her German-based Live and Learn in Kenya charity. 100 Lindens equals approximately 30 cents in real world currency, which pays for one child’s meal. One third of all money raised for each month’s food budget is collected through donations made in Second Life – so, that’s another reason to come along!

** Pirate fancy dress to both these events strongly encouraged! **

Monday, September 18th 19:00: A Wizard of Earthsea

Gyro Muggins reads Ursula K. Le Guin’s first Earthsea Cycle. 

The boy is born on the island of Gont in the archipelago of Earthsea. This is a world infused with magic. Not everyone can control this magic, but those who know the right words and have a wizard soul can learn to utilize the power of the Earth to manipulate objects and events. The boy’s name is Duny; I can tell you that name because the name has no power over him. His true name is something he can only reveal to those he trusts absolutely beyond question.

I know his true name, but fair reader, I’m not sure yet that I can share it with you.

His aunt knows a few things, a handful of words, that can be used to bind things or call animals to her. Duny is particularly adept at calling falcons and other birds of prey. His agile mind soon surpasses what his aunt can teach him. He burns to know more. He is assigned to a mage, Ogion, who tries to teach him about the balance of magic with the Earth. There is always a cost for using magic. Understanding the levy for sorcery is the difference between being just impulsively talented and being wise about what you know.

(Commentary by Jeffrey Keeten.)

Tuesday, September 19th: International Talk Like a Pirate Day:

19:00: “George Was A Pirate…”

Selected adventures from R. Crap Mariner’s “George Canon” of 100-word stories (aka “drabbles”). With Corwyn Allen, Faerie Maven-Pralou, Kayden Oconnell, and Caledonia Skytower.

21:00: Meteor Mags – Hang My Body on the Pier

An original tale for a special “Late Night” on this special day, presented by the author, Matthew Howard.

** Pirate fancy dress to both these events strongly encouraged! **

Wednesday, September 20th, 19:00: Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon

Corwyn Allen reads Spider Robinson’s 1999 anthology.

callahansThe titular saloon is a haven for lost souls; a place where the patrons come for one drink and a chance for a second – but only if they offer an unburdening toast at the fireplace. Mike Callahan, the owner, never judges but sometimes advises in as few words as possible.

The stories in the volume are:

  • “The Guy with the Eyes”
  • “The Time-Traveler”
  • “The Centipede’s Dilemma”
  • “Two Heads Are Better Than One”
  • “The Law of Conservation of Pain”
  • “Just Dessert”
  • “A Voice is Heard in Ramah…”
  • “Unnatural Causes”
  • “The Wonderful Conspiracy”

Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

Thursday, September 21st:

19:00:  PIRATES! – Tom Chist and the Treasure Box

With Shandon Loring (also presented in Kitely  hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

21:00 Seanchai Late Night

Contemporary Sci-Fi-Fantasy with Finn Zeddmore.

 


Please check with the Seanchai Library’s blog for updates and for additions or changes to the week’s schedule.

The featured charity for August and September is Little Kids Rock, transforming lives by restoring, expanding, and innovating music education in schools.

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A Creeping Man, a wizard, pirates and a saloon

Seanchai Library, Holly Kai Park

It’s time to kick-off another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, September 10th

13:30: Tea Time at Baker Street

Seanchai Library once again opens the pages of The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, the final set of twelve Sherlock Holmes short stories first published in the Strand Magazine between October 1921 and April 1927.

This week: The Adventure of the Creeping Man

“MR. SHERLOCK HOLMES was always of opinion that I should publish the singular facts connected with Professor Presbury, if only to dispel once for all the ugly rumours which some twenty years ago agitated the university and were echoed in the learned societies of London …”

So it is that John Watson puts pen to paper to tell the strange tale of the professor, his secretary, who is also engaged to the professor’s daughter, a trip to Prague and the creepers growing up the side of the professor’s house.

The tale is a most peculiar one indeed, and not just for the story itself; The Adventure of the Creeping Man veers somewhat away from Conan Doyle’s usual scientific approach to the unravelling of the mysteries Holmes and Watson face; so much so that it has met with much debate among critics down the years.

To find out more, be sure to turn up on time for a spot of afternoon tea at Baker Street!

16:00 Magicland Storytime: The Black Cauldron

Join Caledonia Skytower at Magicland Park.

Monday, September 11th 19:00: A Wizard of Earthsea

Gyro Muggins reads Ursula K. Le Guin’s first Earthsea Cycle. 

The boy is born on the island of Gont in the archipelago of Earthsea. This is a world infused with magic. Not everyone can control this magic, but those who know the right words and have a wizard soul can learn to utilize the power of the Earth to manipulate objects and events. The boy’s name is Duny; I can tell you that name because the name has no power over him. His true name is something he can only reveal to those he trusts absolutely beyond question.

I know his true name, but fair reader, I’m not sure yet that I can share it with you.

His aunt knows a few things, a handful of words, that can be used to bind things or call animals to her. Duny is particularly adept at calling falcons and other birds of prey. His agile mind soon surpasses what his aunt can teach him. He burns to know more. He is assigned to a mage, Ogion, who tries to teach him about the balance of magic with the Earth. There is always a cost for using magic. Understanding the levy for sorcery is the difference between being just impulsively talented and being wise about what you know.

(Commentary by Jeffrey Keeten.)

Tuesday, September 12th 19:00: Adventure on the High Seas

Selected adventures to whet your appetite for International Talk Like A Pirate Day with Caledonia Skytower

Wednesday, September 13th 19:00: Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon

Corwyn Allen reads Spider Robinson’s 1999 anthology.

callahansThe titular saloon is a haven for lost souls; a place where the patrons come for one drink and a chance for a second – but only if they offer an unburdening toast at the fireplace. Mike Callahan, the owner, never judges but sometimes advises in as few words as possible.

The stories in the volume are:

  • “The Guy with the Eyes”
  • “The Time-Traveler”
  • “The Centipede’s Dilemma”
  • “Two Heads Are Better Than One”
  • “The Law of Conservation of Pain”
  • “Just Dessert”
  • “A Voice is Heard in Ramah…”
  • “Unnatural Causes”
  • “The Wonderful Conspiracy”

Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

Thursday, September 14th 19:00: Blueskin the Pirate

Shandon Loring  reads a short story from Howard Pyle’s Masterpieces.

Cape May and Cape Henlopen form, as it were, the upper and lower jaws of a gigantic mouth, which disgorges from its monstrous gullet the cloudy waters of the Delaware Bay into the heaving, sparkling blue-green of the Atlantic Ocean.

From Cape Henlopen as the lower jaw there juts out a long, curving fang of high, smooth-rolling sand dunes, cutting sharp and clean against the still, blue sky above-silent, naked, utterly deserted, excepting for the squat, white-walled lighthouse standing upon the crest of the highest hill.

Sunday, September 17th 13:00-16:30: The Pirates Are Coming!

A special event to mark International Talk Like A pirate Day – ARRRR! On Tuesday, September 19th. Stories from 13:00 and music and dancing from 14:30. Full details to follow on the Seanchai Library and Holly Kai Park websites.

 


Please check with the Seanchai Library’s blog for updates and for additions or changes to the week’s schedule.

The featured charity for August and September is Little Kids Rock, transforming lives by restoring, expanding, and innovating music education in schools.

Detectives, super humans, Indians and summers

Seanchai Library, Holly Kai Park

It’s time to kick-off another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, September 3rd 13:30: Tea Time at Baker Street

Caledonia Skytower, Corwyn Allen and Kayden Oconnell once again open the pages of The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, the final set of twelve Sherlock Holmes short stories first published in the Strand Magazine between October 1921 and April 1927.

This week: The Problem of Thor Bridge.

“The faculty of deduction is certainly contagious, Watson,” Holmes informs his good friend one October morning after Watson had arrived for breakfast expecting to find Holmes in a depressed mood, wanting for a good, solid case, but finding him instead practically full of the joys of spring.

The comment comes in response to Watson’s observation that such a good mood could only mean that Holmes did indeed have a case. Even so, it is not until after breakfast that the Great Detective reveals the situation.

“You have heard of Neil Gibson, the Gold King?” he said.

“You mean the American Senator?”

“Well, he was once Senator for some Western state, but is better known as the greatest gold-mining magnate in the world.”

“Yes, I know of him. He has surely lived in England for some time. His name is very familiar.”

“Yes, he bought a considerable estate in Hampshire some five years ago. Possibly you have already heard of the tragic end of his wife?”

“Of course. I remember it now. That is why the name is familiar. But I really know nothing of the details.

The details are that the wife of the aforementioned J. Neil Gibson had been most cruelly murdered by none other than the family’s governess, Grace Dunbar. The evidence in the case couldn’t be more clear, nor Miss Dunbar’s guilt more sure.

So the letter Holmes has received protesting her innocence despite all the evidence indicating otherwise, sets the Great detective a pretty riddle. Particularly as it has been written by none other than J. Neil Gibson himself …

Monday, September 4th 19:00: More Than Human

Gyro Muggins reads Theodore Sturgeon’s genre-bending 1953 novel which brings together three of her earlier works   to weave a story about people with extraordinary abilities which can be combined – “bleshed” (itself a blending of “blend” and “mesh”) to make them even more extraordinary.

Take, for example, Lone, the simpleton who can hear other people’s thoughts and make a man blow his brains out just by looking at him; or Janie, who moves things without touching them. Then there are the teleporting twins, who can travel ten feet or ten miles, and Baby, who invented an anti-gravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world except for a conscience.

Six people struggling to find who they are and whether they are meant to help humanity, destroy it, or represent the next step in evolution, the final chapter in the history of the human race. Through them, Theodore Sturgeon explores questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging, with suspense, pathos, and a lyricism rarely seen in science fiction.

Tuesday, September 5th 19:00: One Summer, America 1927

The summer of 1927 was, for the United States, a signature period of the 20th Century. On May 21st, Charles Lindbergh became the first man to make a non-stop crossing of the Atlantic in an aeroplane when The Spirit of St Louis arrived at Le Bourget airfield, near Paris.

Through that summer, Babe Ruth was setting his record for the number of home runs in baseball, while one of the most infamous murder trials in New York’s history took place: that of  Ruth Snyder and her married lover, Henry Judd Gray. They stood accused – and were eventually found guilty of – garrotting of Snyder’s husband in what was a tabloid sensation case.

Meanwhile, in the south the Mississippi burst its banks, leading to widespread flooding and a huge human disaster. Far to the north, Al Capone continued his reign of criminal terror in Chicago, while on the west coast, history was being made with the filming of the world’s first “talking picture” in the form of Al Jolson’s The Jazz Singer, released in October 1927.

All of this  and more is charted by Bill Bryson, in a book written with his characteristic eye for telling detail, and delicious humour. 1927 was the year America stepped out onto the world stage as the main event, and One Summer transforms it all into narrative non-fiction of the highest order. Join Kayden Oconnell for a trip through history as seen by Bryson.

Wednesday, September 6th 19:00: Calahan’s Crosstime Saloon

Corwyn Allen reads Spider Robinson’s 1999 anthology.

callahansThe titular saloon is a haven for lost souls; a place where the patrons come for one drink and a chance for a second – but only if they offer an unburdening toast at the fireplace. Mike Callahan, the owner, never judges but sometimes advises in as few words as possible.

In the first story in the collection, Callahan thinks he’s heard it all until one day, The Guy With The Eyes comes in.

He spends an hour nursing his first drink, then steps up to the fireplace and unburdens himself with the news that he’s an alien, a harbinger of doom for Earth, who will be returning home in just a couple of hours. But when he does, his masters will destroy the planet, convinced human kind is a cancer. Only he’s no longer convinced that this is true, and no longer wants to see the world destroyed…

Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

Thursday, September 7th:

19:00 The Last of the Mohicans

The wild rush of action in this classic frontier adventure story has made The Last of the Mohicans the most popular of James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales.

Deep in the forests of upper New York State, the brave woodsman Hawkeye (Natty Bumppo) and his loyal Mohican friends Chingachgook and Uncas become embroiled in the bloody battles of the French and Indian War.

The abduction of the beautiful Munro sisters by hostile savages, the treachery of the renegade brave Magua, the ambush of innocent settlers, and the thrilling events that lead to the final tragic confrontation between rival war parties create an unforgettable, spine-tingling picture of life on the frontier. And as the idyllic wilderness gives way to the forces of civilization, the novel presents a moving portrayal of a vanishing race and the end of its way of life in the great American forests.

With Shandon Loring. Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

21:00 Seanchai Late Night

Finn Zeddmore presents contemporary Sci-fi & fantasy!

 


Please check with the Seanchai Library’s blog for updates and for additions or changes to the week’s schedule.

The featured charity for August and September is Little Kids Rock, transforming lives by restoring, expanding, and innovating music education in schools.

Victoriana, Americana and science fiction in Second Life

Seanchai Library, Holly Kai Park

It’s time to kick-off another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

Sunday, August 27th

11:30: Victorian Tales

Scintillating adventures from penny dreadfuls to classic Victoriana like selections from Edgar Allan Poe, Kipling, and other icons of Victorian Literature in a special 90 minute session.  Corwyn Allen, Fayleen Bellois, Cybele Moon, Dubhna Rhiadra, and VT Torvalar live in voice at the Victorian London Time Portal.

16:00 Magicland Storytime: The Black Cauldron

Join Caledonia Skytower at Magicland Park.

Monday, August 28th 19:00: More Than Human

Gyro Muggins reads Theodore Sturgeon’s genre-bending 1953 novel which brings together three of her earlier works   to weave a story about people with extraordinary abilities which can be combined – “bleshed” (itself a blending of “blend” and “mesh”) to make them even more extraordinary.

Take, for example, Lone, the simpleton who can hear other people’s thoughts and make a man blow his brains out just by looking at him; or Janie, who moves things without touching them. Then there are the teleporting twins, who can travel ten feet or ten miles, and Baby, who invented an anti-gravity engine while still in the cradle, and Gerry, who has everything it takes to run the world except for a conscience.

Six people struggling to find who they are and whether they are meant to help humanity, destroy it, or represent the next step in evolution, the final chapter in the history of the human race. Through them, Theodore Sturgeon explores questions of power and morality, individuality and belonging, with suspense, pathos, and a lyricism rarely seen in science fiction.

Tuesday, August 29th 19:00: One Summer, America 1927

The summer of 1927 was, for the United States, a signature period of the 20th Century. On May 21st, Charles Lindbergh became the first man to make a non-stop crossing of the Atlantic in an aeroplane when The Spirit of St Louis arrived at Le Bourget airfield, near Paris.

Through that summer, Babe Ruth was setting his record for the number of home runs in baseball, while one of the most infamous murder trials in New York’s history took place: that of  Ruth Snyder and her married lover, Henry Judd Gray. They stood accused – and were eventually found guilty of – garrotting of Snyder’s husband in what was a tabloid sensation case.

Meanwhile, in the south the Mississippi burst its banks, leading to widespread flooding and a huge human disaster. Far to the north, Al Capone continued his reign of criminal terror in Chicago, while on the west coast, history was being made with the filming of the world’s first “talking picture” in the form of Al Jolson’s The Jazz Singer, released in October 1927.

All of this  and more is charted by Bill Bryson, in a book written with his characteristic eye for telling detail, and delicious humour. 1927 was the year America stepped out onto the world stage as the main event, and One Summer transforms it all into narrative non-fiction of the highest order. Join Kayden Oconnell for a trip through history as seen by Bryson.

Wednesday, August 30th 19:00: Wild at Heart

With Aoife Lorefield. Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

Thursday, August 31st: The Last of the Mohicans

The wild rush of action in this classic frontier adventure story has made The Last of the Mohicans the most popular of James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales.

Deep in the forests of upper New York State, the brave woodsman Hawkeye (Natty Bumppo) and his loyal Mohican friends Chingachgook and Uncas become embroiled in the bloody battles of the French and Indian War.

The abduction of the beautiful Munro sisters by hostile savages, the treachery of the renegade brave Magua, the ambush of innocent settlers, and the thrilling events that lead to the final tragic confrontation between rival war parties create an unforgettable, spine-tingling picture of life on the frontier. And as the idyllic wilderness gives way to the forces of civilization, the novel presents a moving portrayal of a vanishing race and the end of its way of life in the great American forests.

With Shandon Loring. Also presented in Kitely (hop://grid.kitely.com:8002/Seanchai/108/609/1528).

 

 


Please check with the Seanchai Library’s blog for updates and for additions or changes to the week’s schedule.

The featured charity for August and September is Little Kids Rock, transforming lives by restoring, expanding, and innovating music education in schools.