Sansar Lectures: Murder in VR

The Murder in VR lecture series. Credit: Linden Lab

Psychological profiling is a tool that today is in commonplace use within law enforcement agencies around the globe. It’s a means of literally getting inside the mindset of a murderer – notably the serial killer – and working out what makes them tick in order to understand things like their underpinning motivations: why they kill, how they might select their victims and murder locations, etc., all in an effort to be able to identify them, perhaps pre-empt them, and bring them to justice.

Profiling has largely entered the public consciousness over the last 30-ish years thanks to crime novelists, films and TV shows, particularly those featuring the FBI. Perhaps the earliest public recognition of criminal profilers came in the form of actor William Petersen: long before he took up the sample kit and got involved in forensic investigation through the original CSI series, he starred in the 1986 film Manhunter, portraying fictional FBI criminal profiler Will Graham from Red Dragon, Thomas Harris’ 1981 psychological thriller.

Dr. Lee Mellor. Via quazoo.com

I mention all of this because an examination of criminal psychology and psychosis is the subject of the second in an interesting series of lectures being presented in Sansar during October.

These lectures are being led by Anglo-Canadian criminologist writer (and – wait for it – alternate country musician; who said people can’t be multi-talented?) Dr. Lee Mellor.

I’m actually a little peeved with myself for missing the first lecture in the series, which took place on Wednesday, October 9th, as I gained an introduction and interest in criminal psychology while at college, thanks to a study of Criminal Shadows: Inside the Mind of the Serial Killer by David Canter, one of the UK’s ground-breaking criminal psychologists and founder of the International Academy for Investigative Psychology, an academy for researchers seeking to apply social science to investigative and legal processes .

Fortunately, that first lecture is available on the official Sansar Twitch channel, and also via YouTube. The rest of the series lines up as follows:

  • Friday, October 11th: Psychopathy and Psychosis – when you use the term ‘psycho’ are you referring to a psychopath or psychotic? Do you even know the difference? Lee Mellor helps us understand the basic neuroscience, psychological features, behaviours, and crime scenes of psychopathic and psychotic offenders through case studies.
  • Monday, October 14th: A motive for Murder – Dr. Mellor examines a plethora of motives to commit acts of murder from the utterly mundane to the thoroughly bizarre, and argues that there is rarely a motive, but rather, a number of intersecting motives, along with debunking the idea of the ‘senseless’ crime.
  • Wednesday, October 16th: M.O. and Signature – an exploration of the crucial concepts of modus operandi and signature, their differentiations, and the necessity of being able to identify and distinguish between the two in order to effectively link crimes and bring an offender to justice.
  • Friday, October 18th: Fetishism and Paraphilia – delves into the bizarre, fascinating, and controversial world of kinks, fetishes, and paraphilia: some utterly harmless, others indisputably dangerous – and some of which can manifest in crimes from breaking and enter to pre-mediated murder.
  • Monday, October 21st: Sexual Sadism  – for details, please refer to the Sansar Events page, once they have been published.

Note that(all lectures commence at 15:30 PDT, and can be found in the Sansar Events page on the web.

While clearly intended to sit hand-in-hand with the Halloween month, this set of lectures actually goes much further than a “gimmicky” play on horrors an things that go bump in the night (in this case, bodies hitting the ground / floor): they can actually help demonstrate how an environment like Sansar can be used for educational / lecture purposes and provide a forum for discussion of real world events, situation and circumstances.

Sadly, given the timing of the series – very late evening for me, when my time tends to be busy in both the physical and the virtual realms, I’m not sure I can make all of the lectures – but I certainly hope to grab them via Twitch or YouTube.

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Sansar: live from the Official Star Trek 2019 Convention

Sansar brings you Star Trek Las Vegas

I make no secret of the fact that I’m a Star Trek fan. I started on a diet of re-runs of The Original Series (which remains my overall favourite, simply because I started watching it at an impressionable age, my early teens), and quickly got hooked on The Next Generation. Within Second Life, I’ve reflected this interest by writing about various Trek-related events or activities (see A Starship Enterprise in Second Life big enough for an avatar crew and Having a little fun with starships for example).

However, when it comes to Star Trek, Sansar is perhaps the place to be. I’ve written in the past about the reproduction of the bridge of the USS Enterprise, NCC-1701. It’s not entirely accurate, but it is nevertheless impressive. There’s also the Roddenberry Nexus.

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus

These experiences reflect a partnership with Roddenberry Entertainment, which has also seen the broadcasting of the Roddenberry Entertainment’s mission Logs podcasts into Sansar, trivia competitions, and Q&A events with acknowledged Trek experts.

This involvement with Trek continues this weekend with Sansar providing access to Star Trek cast members and guest stars who are attending the Official Star Trek Convention taking place in Las Vegas.

Suzi Plakston – one of the STLV convention guests who can be seen via Sansar

These events comprise:

  • “Live From” on Thursday, August 1st, Friday, August 2nd, Saturday, August 3rd and Sunday, August 4th from 09:00 PDT, with guests:
    • Suzie Plakson (K’Ehleyr / Lt. Selar, M.D. in Star Trek: The Next Generation; Female Q, Star Trek: Voyager, Tarah, Star Trek: Enterprise).
    • John Billingsley (Dr. Phlox, Star Trek: Enterprise).
    • Jeffrey Combs (Brunt/Weyoun/Tiron, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine;  Penk, Star Trek: Voyager; Shran;  Krem, Star Trek: Enterprise).
    • Casey Biggs (Damar, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine).
    • Tim Russ (Devor, Star Trek: The Next Generation; T’Kar, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine; Commander Tuvok, Star Trek: Voyager; USS Enterprise NCC-1701-B Bridge Officer (/”Tuvok”) Star Trek: Generations).
  • “Meet-and Greets” 30-minute sessions with:
The Roddenberry Theatre, by C3rb3rus, location for the Star Trek Las Vegas events

So, if you are a Trek fan (and have a PC!), make a note of the dates and times, and join the fun – I might even see you at some of the sessions 🙂 .

 

Sansar: R32 Movement update

Desktop mode throw indicator (shown in 1st person view here). One of the R32 additions to Sansar. Credit: Linden Lab

On Tuesday, April 30th, Linden Lab updated the Sansar Movement release. An official summary of the update is available, and please refer to that document for details of bug fixes. Highlights of the release key features reviewed here are:

  • Avatar customisation, movement and gameplay updates.
  • Client Store updates.
  • Scripting updates.
  • Edit mode improvements.

Initial Notes

As with the majority of Sansar deployments, this update requires the automatic download and installation of a client update, particularly as it involves changes affecting the Sansar avatar system.

Avatar Updates

Uniform Scaling

Until this release, all avatars in Sansar have been of the same male / female height. With R32, users can now individually scale their avatars from 0.5 to 1.25 the scale of the default avatar size.

The scaling option will scale both avatar and current outfit and accessories. As it is part of the overall avatar customisation process, scaling can be applied to both existing looks  – or now looks can be created and scaled for specific purposes, if preferred (so you could have a small and tall avatar in the same outfit for visiting different experiences, just by changing your look, rather than adjusting the scale of the one avatar).

To change an avatar’s scale:

  • Click the Create button and then Style My Avatar to go to Look Book.
  • From the Look Book panel, select the avatar you’d like to re-scale (if you have more than one).
  • Click customise (lower right corner of our Home Space  / Look Book display,
  • Click the avatar icon (arrowed below) in the Avatar style panel to display the avatar customisation options.
  • Click the slider button at the top of the panel (arrowed below, right).
  • Use the Scale slider to uniformly re-scale your current avatar.
  • Save the look.
Sansar avatar uniform scaling, accessed through the Look Book and Avatar customisation panel (right), and the two extremes of height compared with the default female avatar height (note the sofa behind the avatars for reference).

Points of note with avatar scaling:

  • Scaling will work on custom avatars.
  • Scaling does not affect the avatar locomotion graph, so small avatars will appear to move faster than their taller cousins. Similarly, very tall avatars will seem to move more lugubriously than their smaller cousins.
  • In VR mode, the world view is scaled accordingly to avatar height.
  • Scaling can cause some clothing glitches to become more apparent.

Avatar Crouching

Avatars can now crouch and move. In Desktop mode, make sure the mouse isn’t in the Chat panel and tap C to crouch  /  stand up, and move as usual. In VR move, users must physical adopt a crouched pose.

Avatar crouching. Credit: Linden Lab

Points of note with crouching:

  • The avatar’s motion will be correspondingly slower when crouched – just as we tend to move slower when crouched in the physical world.
  • The collider / bounding box for the avatar will also automatically adjust to match the avatar’s height as well, making it possible for tunnels, etc., to be made through which avatars must move when crouched.
  • The collider / bounding box in VR will collapse in accordance to how low the user crouched.

Desktop Movement Updates

Two new options have been adding to the Settings panel (More Options > Settings, then scroll down).

  • Keyboard Turn: if set to On, your avatar turns left and right when pressing A or D ( / Left or Right arrow) respectively. If set to Off, your avatar sidesteps to the left or right (without turning) instead.
  • Face Forward: if set to On, your avatar attempts to face the direction your camera is looking while you are moving. If set to Off, your avatar faces the direction your are moving.

Remember to click the Save button to preserve your preferred settings.

The new Desktop avatar movement Settings options (left – see notes above) and the new Desktop mode throw indicators (right – see below)

Avatar Gameplay Updates

With R32, Desktop mode now also has a new desktop throw indicator. To use it:

  • Pick up an object (left-click on the object).
  • Click and hold the left mouse button. A dotted line arc will appear showing the flight of the object when the mouse button is released.
  • A blue circle at the end of the dotted line arc will show the likely destination of the object when thrown – use the mouse wheel to adjust this back and forth.
  • When ready, release the left mouse button as usual to throw.

Note that depending on your Desktop movement settings, you might be able to adjust the left/right aspect of your throw by moving to the left or right (this can be easier in 1st person (F3) mode).

Additional Avatar Options

  • New simple skeleton: a simplified avatar skeleton reference file (70 bones, and refered to as a “low resolution” skeleton in the reference documents) to make it easier to hook up animations. See Avatar reference files in the Sansar knowledge base.
  • Mixamo animation support: use the simplified skeleton on Mixamo and take advantage of their library of animations. See Using the animation skeleton to create custom animations in the Sansar knowledge base.

Continue reading “Sansar: R32 Movement update”

Sansar 2019 Product Meetings week #3 w/audio

Sansar Social Hubblog post

The following notes were taken from the Sansar Product Meeting held on Thursday, January 17th. The meeting was chaired by Stanley, the Director of Product for Sansar at Linden Lab and who was marking his first time leading a product meeting. Also in attendance (who I noted) were Cara, Aleks, Leslie, Nix and Stretch Linden.

Stanley has been with the Lab for some six months, and has been working closely with the Product team with a focus on improving the consumer experience, particularly the integration with Steam.

Sansar Dollars To US Dollar Conversions

On Wednesday, January 16th, 2019, Linden Lab published a Sansar blog post outlining Sansar Dollar to US dollar conversions. The post follow-on from changes announced in December related to Sansar becoming available on Steam – specifically the closure of the SandeX, which has been replaced by a flat-rate exchange rate for S$<>USD transactions.

The latest blog post outlines the key points of the new exchange process. In short:

  • Sansar dollars can be converted to USD at the rate of S$250 to $1.00. However, anyone who created their Sansar account before December 31, 2018, can exchange at the legacy rate of S$143 to $1.00 through until  December 31, 2019, after which the conversion rate for all accounts will be S$250 to $1.00.
  • The Process Credit page has been re-enabled for moving USD to PayPal accounts. However, to allow for processing of funds that may come via Steam, processing may take up to 30 days to complete a request.

However, there is more – and it has been somewhat negatively received.

  • Only “Earned Dollars” can be cashed out. That is, only S$ obtained via the sale of goods / services. S$ that are purchased or received as a gift / tip cannot later be cashed out (although all S$ held before the January 16th blog post have been converted to Earned Dollar Status).
  • It has been calculated that, even allowing for easements elsewhere in the system, creators are losing some 60% of potential income when cashing out.

This latter point was of particular concern at the Product Meeting, but the Lab’s hand is forced on the matter due to Sansar now also being provisioned through Steam, there is also concern as to whether the S$ > USD exchange rate might undergo further adjustments other than that planned for the end of 2019.

There are currently no plans to introduce adjustments to the cash-out exchange rate beyond those indicated in the blog post, which amount to anyone cashing-out paying around 60% in commissions. To help offset this, the Lab no longer takes a commission on any store-based transactions between users; they only take a commission on the cashing-out of S$.

Even so, and not unreasonably, creators feel that the shifting of fee payments to the cashing-out process means they are effectively subsidising the Steam integration, particularly given that – by the Lab’s own admission – the majority of users in Sansar are still coming directly into the platform, rather than via Steam, yet Steam still take a cut of the cash-out transactions.

The Lab acknowledge this is currently one-sided, but given they have no means at this point in time to accurately judge how much of an impact Steam will have on Sansar’s usage, they have erred on the side of caution. But whether in time the commission percentages could be adjusted, very much depends on how traffic flow through Steam develops over time, with changes to the cash-out process liable to be considered very carefully before being implemented.

It was asked whether Sansar could be provisioned through Steam “without the money part” in order to simplify matters. The problem seen with this approach is it would exclude Steam users from any economic engagement in the platform (as their transactions must come via the Steam wallet), reducing their interest in using the platform (no ability to buy avatar accessories, good, etc.).

The Future With Steam and Other Providers (e.g. Oculus)

Linden Lab see Steam as the “industry standard” for accessing games and for using VR with games. As such, they are unlikely to move away from the current partnership. However, if over time the relationship with Steam does not prove beneficial to Sansar in terms of growth, use, economy, etc., the platform is not in any way locked-in to Steam on a permanent basis, and so a future separation is not impossible.

The Oculus store has also been looked at as a potential channel for Sansar, and talks have been held. However, because of the relationship between Oculus and Facebook, this had proven a lot harder, but is still being worked on.

New User Experience

New User Experience Steam “versus” Sansar

There still seems to be a perception that users coming to Sansar via Steam have a different new user experience to those coming via Sansar.com. Aside for the sign-up process, this is incorrect. Sansar as provided through Steam is no different to Sansar accessed via the website / direct client download: all users go through the same on-boarding experience with their Home Space and the client tutorial, and the new Social Hub.

Enhancing the New User Experience

There are internal discussions at the Lab on further enhancements to the new user experience, such as adding some form of achievements / cosmetic awards system or similar, in order to encourage engagement (particularly among Steam users).

One of the issues Sansar faces (like Second Life) is how it should be pitched, simply because the potential use-cases are so vast and different. Creators, for example, have different reasons to try the platform to consumers; even gamers with an interest in modding view things differently to those purely interested in game play. Thus, the Lab is still juggling with approaches.

In terms of Steam, one of the most basic areas in determining how the appeal of the platform could be improved is via the constructive feedback offered through reviews, given that when provided, these most frequently involve comments on the “non-standard” approach to how control options are laid out on the hand controllers.

Gaming Templates

In keeping with previous Product Meeting summaries in these pages, the Sansar Team is working on various game-style Sansar templates (e.g. shooting games). It is hoped that when these become available, they will encourage creators / users to utilise them within their own experiences, further helping to drive engagement in Sansar.

These templates have also seen the Lab considering issues such as scoring mechanisms, persistence of scores / progress between sessions, etc.

Upcoming R29 Changes

The upcoming R29 release (the first for 2019) includes some further VR updates related to a user’s “connection” to their avatar.

  • One of these will be for the avatar to be more in sync with a users body movements, rather than lagging behind, as can be the case at the moment.
  • Another is to provide better control of arm movements (although this wasn’t clear to me, I assume this is related to keeping the arms more naturally in line with the avatar’s body when moving the hand controllers around).

R29 should also see the removal of the height calibration menu and storing a person’s height when using VR. There will still be options for setting it, if required (such as when a headset is being used by two different people); but where the headset is only used by the one individual, it shouldn’t be necessary to re-calibrate between sessions.

Continue reading “Sansar 2019 Product Meetings week #3 w/audio”

Sansar announces 2nd live comedy event

via Sansar / Linden Lab

Linden Lab have announced the second live comedy event to be held in Sansar. The SF Sketchfest will take place between 13:00-14:00 PST (21:00-22:00 GMT) on January 12th at the new SF Sketchfest Playhouse. The event will feature comedians David Cross (Mr. Show and Arrested Development fame) and Amy Schumer (MADTv, Insatiable, Shameless), together with openers Irene Tu and Chad Opitz).

Compared to the Comedy Gladiators event hosted in Sansar on December 10th, 2018 (read more here), the SF Sketchfest is receiving fairly low-key and what seems to be very short-notice advertising through social media (by contrast, Comedy Gladiators was promoted via a press notice via the Lab).

Ticket for the event are USD $4.99 each, and can be purchased directly from the Sansar Store.

The SF Sketchfest participants: David Cross and Amy Schumer, Irene Tu and Chad Opitz

These events utilise Sansar’s Broadcast capability, allows avatar audiences across two or more instances of an experience to experience performing avatars, with instances allowing a greater opportunity for friends to attend the vent together (although more work is required to make this more fully possible).

SF Sketchfest is also the second official Sansar event to use the platform’s new ticketing capability, which – when expanded – will be a further means for creator / experience holders to monetise their offerings in Sansar.

Sansar launches on Steam

Sansar on Steam. Courtesy of Linden Lab

As anticipated following last week’s community feedback hour / product meeting, Sanar has officially launched on Steam – although at the time of writing, there has been no official press release on the Lab’s corporate site.

Instead, the announcement came via a Sansar blog post, and a tweet via the official Sansar Twitter account.

As of today, December 5th, we are officially live on Steam!

We wanted to give a huge thank you to our current community who have been so supportive, and to extend a warm “Welcome” to all our new community members joining us from Steam!

You can find us on Steam as an Early Access Game, where we’re free to download. Even better, you’ll get to enjoy all the benefits of Steam as a social platform for gamers including full access to our Steam Community Hub!

– From the Sansar blog post announcing the launch

As the blog post notes, Sansar is being made available on Steam’s early access programme – a move the Lab hopes will help Steam users’ expectations regarding the platform and the fact it is still in development.

The Sansar page on Steam Early Access

The Sansar page on Steam includes a promotional video and a series of images from Sansar. In addition, and to underline the platform’s status, there is also a Q&A element, which addresses a number of questions, including:

Why Early Access?

“Sansar is a place where you can hang out with friends, play games, explore new worlds, and share incredible creations, but we can’t do that without you! Being in Early Access is important to us to make sure we’re hearing directly from the community on what you’d like to see and do in Sansar. Come join us!”

Approximately how long will this game be in Early Access?

“We plan on staying in Early Access until Sansar is the very best it can be. We’re constantly making improvements, and we’re eager for your feedback.”

How is the full version planned to differ from the Early Access version?

“We want Sansar to be the place where people can connect with communities and celebrate what they love through immersive virtual experiences, interactive events, customizable avatars, and easy creation. That’s why we plan to develop even more features around socialization, interactivity, personalization, and creation – elements that enrich the social experiences our platform enables. Plans will change based on your feedback, and we’re always listening and learning.”

What is the current state of the Early Access version?

“Right now, Sansar lets you host and attend virtual events, play games, explore user-created experiences, and buy and sell merchandise in the Sansar Store. Meet friends for a watch party and tailgate. Buy clothing and accessories for your avatars, or objects for the virtual experiences you build.”

The sansar.com log-in page now allows web log-ins using Steam account credentials (l). Sansar and Steam integration allows logging-in to Sansar using a user’s Steam credentials (r)

The launch blog post also has some important words for existing Sansar users (or those who have already created a Sansar account). these include:

  • Existing users can still access Sansar directly from their downloaded version of the client, and use all the capabilities with it, including creating new accounts; they do not have to use Steam to log-in.
  • However:
    • Existing Sansar users with a Steam account can add Sansar to their Steam account and launch it from there it they wish
    • Or if they are logged into Steam and opt  to launch Sansar via Steam, they will be prompted to log-in to Sansar with the account of their choice (Sansar, Steam or Twitch).
  • There will be no direct merging of Sansar and Steam accounts (“at this time”).
  • User with an existing Sansar account can continue purchasing Sansar Dollars using the payment information they have on file with Linden Lab.
    • However, users signing-up for Sansar via Steam must use their Steam Wallet to purchase Sansar Dollars.

The Sansar website gives full details on how to integrate Steam and Sansar accounts to get the most out of both. Once integrated, it is possible to access the Sansar Community on Steam directly through the Sansar client:

Accessing the Sansar community on Steam through the Sansar client (Shift-Tab) – requires Sansar / Steam integration for existing Sansar users / download of the Sansar client via Steam for Steam users

It will be interesting to see how this all goes for the Lab. Several years ago, there was an attempt to add Second Life to Steam, which didn’t go so well. However, the Lab believe they have learned some important lessons as a result of that process,  and the Sansar presentation through Steam does appear to be somewhat more integrated.