2018 SL project updates 21/1: Simulator User Group meeting

The Shire; Inara Pey, May 2018, on FlickrThe Shireblog post

It’s a quiet start to the week.

Server Deployments for week #21

There are no server deployments planned for week #21! To quote Mazidox Linden in the server deployment thread:

Hey everyone! We’ve got a bunch of things we’re still testing this week and don’t have any rolls for any channels (Second Life Server, RC Bluesteel, RC LeTigre, RC Magnum, or RC Cruller), and we don’t anticipate any rolling restarts. We’re aiming to have at least one new server version through testing by next week, and hopefully we’ll have a better view of that by Thursday. If you’re interested please join us at the SBUG meeting on Aditi.

RC Cruller is likely one of the smaller RC selections (like Snack and Cake), and is apparently named for the small cake made of rich dough twisted or curled and fried in deep fat (I can feel my arteries hardening just typing that!).

SL Viewer

The Ouzo Maintenance viewer, version 5.1.4.515016, was promoted to the de facto release viewer in week #20. As a result:

  • The Love Me Render RC viewer containing rendering fixes and improvements updated to version 5.1.5.515528 on May 22nd, 2018.
  • A new Maintenance RC viewer, code-named Pálinka, after the traditional fruit brandy popular in Central Europe, was release on May 21st, 2018. Maintenance RC 5.1.5.515527 contains some 36 fixes and improvements, as specified in the release notes.

Outside of these updates, the viewer pipelines are as follows:

  • Current Release version 5.1.4.515016, dated May 7, promoted May 16 – formerly the Ouzo Release Candidate.
  • Project viewers:
  • Linux Spur viewer, version 5.0.9.329906, dated November 17, 2017 and promoted to release status 29 November – offered pending a Linux version of the Alex Ivy viewer code.
  • Obsolete platform viewer, version 3.7.28.300847, May 8, 2015 – provided for users on Windows XP and OS X versions below 10.7.

 

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A Butterfly Beach in Second Life

Butterfly Beach; Inara Pey, May 2018, on FlickrButterfly Beach – click any image for full size

Updated May 23rd: to include information on the donation box for the region.

Miro Collas dropped me a tweet suggesting Caitlyn and I take a look at Butterfly Beach,  a Homestead region that recently opened to the public. The region has been designed by (the always delightfully named) Funky Banana (FunkyBananas) working with Lien Lowe. Funky was also responsible for Banana Bay, which we enjoyed visiting in the summer of 2017.

Butterfly Beach shares something of a common heritage with Banana Bay: both offer sunny, sandy beaches, a feeling of getting away from it all and an opportunity to relax and simply spend time in thought or with someone. From the air (or the Map) it’s clear how the island came by its name, and a visit starts on what might be considered the butterfly’s upper right wing (actually down towards the south-east corner of the region in terms of Map orientation).

Butterfly Beach; Inara Pey, May 2018, on FlickrButterfly Beach

First impressions on arriving is that this could be a small vacation island just off the coast of Italy or perhaps in the Aegean, available to those who want to escape the every day demands of life. A lone, single-story house sits towards the centre of the island, looking to the west and east. Tuscan in style, it shares the low-lying island with a scattering of outhouses: a small stone-built barn, a wooden boathouse and a small beach house, also built from wood.

A wooden deck extends eastward out over the sea a short distance from the house. The fencing around the house seems to lay claim to the deck such that it is easy to imagine wandering across the sand from the house to enjoy breakfast on the deck as the Sun eases its way higher over the eastern horizon.

Butterfly Beach; Inara Pey, May 2018, on FlickrButterfly Beach

As might be gathered from the name of the region, beaches are very much the feature of the island. However, rather than offering a single contiguous stretch of coastal sands running around the island, Funky and lien have carefully used small outcrops of rocks and runs of rough grass dotted with bushes to break the island’s sands into a number of discrete – and entirely natural looking – sandy headlands and small, curving coves.

Each of these little beaches has its own attraction, be it a simple blanket laid out on the sand or deck chairs under a parasol, through to a tent or makeshift shelter, all the way to the simply but cosily furnished beach house. Rowing boats and kayaks are drawn up on the sand or undergoing a repaint in the boat shed, swings hang from trees and wooden benches can be found amidst the grass. All of this gives the island an additional attraction and encourages time spent just wandering and appreciating, as well as in sitting and enjoying the setting.

Butterfly Beach; Inara Pey, May 2018, on FlickrButterfly Beach

Restful, set beneath an early morning’s summer sky and very photogenic, Butterfly Island is well worth a visit. If you do take photos, there is an open invitation to share them through the region’s Flickr group. A donations “box” in the form of a butterfly can be found near the landing point – so if you enjoy your visit,, do please consider making a donation towards the region’s continued upkeep.

Thanks again to Miro for the pointer, and to chericolette (see her comment below) for the pointer to the donation box, which I’d missed during my two visits to the region!

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