Keisei: the returning

Back in September last year, I visited Keisei, Daddio Dow’s fabulous region, and was captivated. To my shame, I admit I’ve not had any real opportunity to get back since, despite the region being so evocative.

However, when a personal invitation arrives from Daddio, asking me whether I’d like to pay a visit and see what is new following some work he’s carried out, I was grabbing my camera and heading straight on over.

Keisei
Keisei

“I’ve done a bit of remodelling,” Daddio told me, “but what I think you and your readers will really get a kick out of is not so much the sim, but the trees I’ve found by Mitsuko Kytori of Hayabusa Designs. These trees and plants are marvels and deserve to be recognized, photographed and admired.” I have to admit that having seen them, I can only agree.

The changes made to the region are both subtle and widespread, and definitely make Keisei a place to visit once more. I’m just irritated that due to the “ERROR: LLDrawable::destroy: Illegal deletion of LLDrawable!” crash when using the snapshot floater, and which seems to be prevalent in SSB/A-enabled v3 viewers, I’m restricted grabbing screen caps a lot of the time on regions which are either busy or (as in this case) use a sim surround. This tends to make for a Growly Me.

Keisei
Keisei

Among the changes made are a number of new private residences – so please take care should you explore; the majority of the region is open to visitors, but some of the houses are equipped with security systems, and all visitors are asked to respect residents’ privacy.

Other changes within Keisei include a relocation for the bath house, which comes down from the sky while the tree house spa now sits up at 1,000m. The arrival point has been beautifully re-worked, and elements of the coastline remodelled; all of which adds up to a lot to see and enjoy.

Keisei
Keisei

The region remains a photographer’s delight, and I really do urge anyone into SL photography who has not visited Keisei to do so; there are so many opportunities here for some stunning images – and the entire region naturally lends itself to a host of windlight settings.

I have to confess that I’d actually missed the place as I nosed around and snapped away. This is a region which really is worth the time to visit. And if you’re looking for an oriental-themed home, there are a couple of parcels available for rent as I write!

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5 thoughts on “Keisei: the returning

  1. Indeed, it’s a fabulous build and Daddio has done a fantastic job with it. One observation, though: builds like this lend themselves to black & white photography really well, and the resulting images end up being even more evocative and powerful than colour. Perhaps it’s a good idea to use monochrome a bit more. 🙂

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    1. The major reason I’ve not tended to de-saturate pictures is that it requires post-processing, which I tend to avoid; I like to see what I can capture directly through the viewer & the tools / options provided (DOF, vignetting, cloud maps, etc, and depending on the viewer I’m using). However, there may well be more monochrome shots of places appearing in the future.

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      1. I understand the preference to avoid post-processing; I personally can think of far too many cases of excessively and poorly post-processed images, often coming from people (who shan’t be named) who fashion themselves as “experts” in SL photography.

        And, to be honest, turning a colour snapshot to monochrome is often a bit more involved and laborious than it would appear to be. But, when done right, it can be greatly rewarding, providing results that can equal the ones produced through the use of orange, red etc filters in front of the lens of a camera loaded with black & white film.

        That said, the monochrome image that starts off the article works wonderfully and is absolutely beautiful.

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