Sansar “watch room” contest: S$5,000 + Oculus Rift

Courtesy of Linden Lab

Linden Lab is running another Sansar experience creation competition, this one with a S$5,000 first prize (equal to US $50) and an Oculus Rift headset and touch controllers (approx US $400) up for grabs.

For this competition, entrants are asked to build a “watch room” – a space where people can gather to watch a media stream on one of three topics: anime, sport or pets. The “watch room” can be as complex or as simple as entrants desire, so long as the environment matches the subject matter of the media stream (so if the video is of pets, then pets should feature in the experience design).

The Dotaworld lounge space, by Sansar’s Community Manager, Eliot, is offered as a suggestion for a simple “watch room” layout – although entrants to the content should decorate their environments to match the style of media they have chosen

Videos themselves should be drawn from Twitch, YouTube or Vimeo, and should be played on a purpose-built media surface, or a suitable media surface obtained through the Sansar Store, some examples of which include:

All of which are available for download and use free-of-charge.

Entries are made by publishing completed entries in the Sansar Atlas and then sharing a link to the experience on Twitter, using the hashtag #MySansarLounge and tagging @SansarOfficial with the link.

OpTic Gaming’s official Greenwall VR Sansar experience could be considered an example of a more complex watch room style of experience

The closing date for entries is Sunday, September 30th, 2018. The full rules for entry can be found on the Sansar website, with perhaps the most important being that experiences entered into the competition cannot break copyright law or feature intellectual property – including the media stream – that the user does not own the rights to.

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More Star Trek in Sansar: the Roddenberry Nexus

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus – click any image for full size

In May 2018, Linden lab via their design team of Sansar Studios launched a collaboration with Roddenberry Entertainment, run by Eugene “Rod” Roddenberry Jr, the son of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry. It saw the opening of a new experience, The Bridge of the USS Enterprise (read here for more) and came with a promise of “more to come”, probably around the time of the Star Trek Las Vegas 2018 convention (Auguest 1st through 5th, 2018). Well, in keeping with that promise, on Wednesday, August 1st, Linden Lab and Roddenberry Entertainment unveiled the next step in their Sansar collaboration.

The Roddenberry Nexus is billed as “the final frontier of fan engagement. Experience the legacy of Roddenberry in a whole new way – never-before-seen props, costumes, and so much more.” And it is a beautiful build; albeit one perhaps a little light (for the time being) on the kind of detail Trek fans like myself might like to see.

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus: The experience is fairly complex, starting at the spawn point, bottom right, proceeding through the lower exhibition space, thence via corridor to a teleporting “turbo elevator” to the upper three galleries, which are linked by a central lift platform

The spawn point for the experience is very mindful of the cabin designs seen in 1979’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture (ST:TMP), complete with corner lighting column. Here one can listen to an introduction to the Nexus from Rod Roddenberry before passing through the waiting door into a ship’s corridor.

This leads to the first display room, which, other than the couch at the far end is a little suggestive of the engineering space found in the Enterprise-D of Next Generation fame. It i dominated by a model of the McQuarrie concept for a radically altered USS Enterprise design, which is seated on what could otherwise be taken to be representative of Geordi La Forge’s engineering table.

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus: personal memorabilia from the lives of Gene and Majel Roddenberry, reproduced in Sansar

This was the design (seen at the top of this article) being considered for one of the potential returns of Star Trek following the 1969 cancellation of what was to become known as a The Original Series (TOS). This design is perhaps most readily associated with the unproduced TV series, Star Trek: Phase II, however, as the text accompanying the model notes, originally, the design was put forward for a Star Trek film, Planet of the Titans, which was pushed to one side in 1977 in favour of the new TV series concept. While both film and series were ultimately never made, as every Trek fan will know, and as the text again confirms, the design did make two on-screen appearances in Star Trek; The Next Generation, and formed the inspiration for the Crossfield class of vessel seen in the latest incarnation of TV-based Trek, Star Trek Discovery.

Also to be found on this level are some wonderful miniatures representing props from the original series and Trek’s first big screen outing. There are also models more personal to the life of the Roddenberrys: a reproduction of the Kaypro wordprocessor model used by Gene Roddenberry after he gave up on the typewriter (a computer perhaps made most famous by science fiction author Sir Arthur C. Clarke), a copy of Majel Barrett-Roddenberry’s personalised car license plate, and a model of the infamous IDIC Medallion.

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus: recalling the 1973 Star Trek animated TV series

Beyond this, on the additional levels, reached by teleport and a working elevator, can be found more in the way of reproductions of various Trek uniforms, together with artwork from (again) ST:TMP in the form of storyboard sequences, and also from one of the more overlooked aspects of the franchise – the 1973 animated series. Additional displays along the corridors complete the initial content, while communications panels spaced throughout the experience provide audio information from a range of hosts, all of whom have ties to, or worked on, the various Trek incarnations.

In terms of the individual series and films, the Nexus is perhaps a little light: The Motion Picture gets fair coverage, but the other films – outside of things like uniforms and insignia – are almost entirely absent. However, Trek is a big subject, and much of the latter history is more than likely fairly familiar to most Trek fans, so this can perhaps be forgiven, particularly as the Nexus will be expanded over time. The infamous Kelvin Universe and Star Trek Discovery are present, albeit in a most subtle manner (check the insignia display along one corridor). It’s also probably not unfair to say that trying to cover everything  – even leaving aside 52 years of history being voluminous – is likely made more difficult by the complex web of rights involved in Trek (CBS holding the television rights, Paramount retaining the big screen rights and so on).

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus: prop from The motion Picture (l), the original TV pilot of The Cage (c) and The Original Series (Klingon disruptor, r)

Those attending  STLV 2018  have the opportunity to visit the Nexus in VR – and possibly wind an Oculus headset and “Roddenberry Goodies” in a raffle. There weren’t too many people availing themselves of the experience during my three visits – but then, I’m across the Atlantic and half a continent away from Las Vegas, so it’s unlikely my visits coincided with times when I was in the experience (05:00 and 07:00 Las Vegas time on my 2nd and 3rd visits).

As a means to attract an audience, approaches like this – offering something unusual and with a guaranteed niche audience – is a subtle way of increasing people’s awareness of Sansar, if not a guarantee of obtaining extended growth in terms of active engagement. Certainly, if it is emphasised the Nexus and The Bridge of the USS Enterprise can both be accessed from PC systems without the need for VR and the Nexus is to be grown in scope, it might encourage some of those visiting by way of STLV to keep an eye on Sansar for the future. That said, I am a little surprised that while the spawn point offers a teleport to the Hollywood Art Museum, there doesn’t appear to be an opportunity for people to hop over to The Bridge of the USS Enterprise.

Sansar: Roddenberry Nexus; Inara Pey, August 2018, on FlickrSansar: Roddenberry Nexus: reproductions of storyboard art from Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Given the niche nature of Trek fandom in the global scheme of things, the fact that Linden Lab have struck up a working relationship with Roddenberry Entertainment led me to wonder how many Trek fans might be at the Lab. It was a question, alongside one concerning future plans for the Nexus, that I was able to put to Jason Gholston, who heads-up the Lab’s Sansar Studios.

Yes… Many Trek fans at Linden. Sansar Studios’ Torley loves Star Trek! This is just the beginning. We should see the Roddenberry Nexus expand in time! So many fantastic stories to tell and artefacts to share.

– Jason Gholston, head of Sansar Studios, on support at the Lab for Star Trek and future Nexus plans

So why not pull out your communicators / tap your combadges and beam over to the Nexus!

Experience URL

Sansar: experience counts increased for creators

Courtesy of Linden Lab

In something of a (to me, at least) surprising move, Linden Lab has announced across-the-board increases in the number of experiences each subscription level of users can have published.

The new limits come into immediate effect and are as follows:

  • Free users: Increased from 3 to 20 experiences.
  • Creator (US $9.99 per month): Increased from 5 to 25 experiences.
  • Super-Creator (US $29.99 per month): Increased from 10 to 30 experiences.
  • Professional ($99.99 per month): Increased from 20 to 40 experiences.

The major surprise in the announcement is its sheer scale, with free accounts seeing the limit on the number of allowed experiences increase almost 600% – huge by any standard (the others being 400%, 200% and 100% respectively).

Give the scale of the increases, during the July 20th, 2018 Sansar Product Meeting, questions were asked about whether the Lab was looking to increase transaction fees off the back or these changes, and what will be done to maintain the attractiveness of the paid subscription levels, given the 20 experiences available with free accounts will likely meet the needs of most active creators.

In addressing the fees issue, Landon from the Sansar Product team indicated that it is not the intent to make any alternations to other fees being charged by the Lab as a result of these changes, although he could rule out future possible changes as Sansar continues to develop. Eliot, the Sansar Community Manager also made it clear the increases to allowed experiences are not part of any bigger plan to increase fees or anything else.

In terms of maintaining the value of Sansar paid subscription options, Landon indicated the plan will most likely be to make them more attractive by adding further practical benefits and perks in addition to the current Marvelous Designer free trial and subscription discounts.

The initial response to the announcement among those actively engaged in Sansar has been positive. However, and from more of an “outsiders” perspective, I found myself considering both the strengths and the possible weaknesses of the move.

The Secret Of Mount Shasta; Inara Pey, July 2018, on FlickrQuality experiences within Sansar – such as The Secret Of Mount Shasta – are a major means of encouraging engagement in the platform. The increased limited on published experiences could encourage a new push in experiences – perhaps more multi-part / linked experiences for games or learning

On the strength side, it could well – and the Lab hopes – up the ante for creativity in Sansar. More experiences means the opportunity to be more creative – and potentially more adventurous. How about something like a true multi-chapter (experience) quest or adventure (capabilities and functionality, of course, allowing).

On the minus side the Atlas – still the main gateway into Sansar experiences –  is dogged by the fact that of the 1,000+ experiences within it, only a couple of dozen might be regarded as actually engaging to an audience. Also, with just the first 8 or 10 in the list tending to show people in them, scrolling through the Atlas tends to suggest that Sansar is actually a very empty / lonely place. Simply having people add more experiences to the list  – especially things like testing environments, sandboxes, etc., could actually both further “hide” then worthwhile experiences and increase the feeling that Sansar is “empty” when browsing the Atlas.

1,017 public experiences with just 8 apparently having visitors  – if the increase in published experiences causes a further upswing in the total count of experiences in the Atlas, it could make Sansar appear even “emptier”

But, growing something like Sansar is difficult, particularly when many core capabilities  – a permissions system that would enable commence on the platform, for example – seem no closer today than they did when the Public Creator Beta launched a year ago. But while such observations might reinforce the case for Sansar perhaps having been launched prematurely, the fact is it is here, and efforts need to be made to try to grow the level of interest in the platform – and offering a greater range of experiences might be one way to do this.

However, even if it doesn’t encourage people to come take a look at Sansar (and my feeling is that any growth in platform usage requires a far more concerted campaign on the part of Linden Lab), offering more experiences to creators is meeting a long-standing request. As such, it’ll be interesting to see how people opt to make use of the increase in the coming weeks / months.

Star Trek beaming in to Sansar, May 22nd 2018

The Bridge of the USS Enterprise NCC-1701, will be warping into Sansar on May 22nd, 2018, as new social hangout in a partnership between Linden Lab and Roddenberry Entertainment Inc. Credit: Linden Lab, via Roddenberry Entertainment Inc.

Update: the podcast, as uploaded to YouTube, is now appended to the end of this article, with thanks to Wurfi!

It’s no secret that I enjoy and appreciate Star Trek – notably The Original Series, although I’m also partial to The Next Generation (the other incarnations never really resonated with me in the same way). In my late teens and twenties, I helped organise a number of Star Trek conventions in the UK, while in these pages, I’ve written about Loki Eliot’s freebie boxed starship combat game (2013), and in 2016, about Cathy Foil’s stunning, two regions long and avatar-sized USS Enterprise, NCC-1701.

So on May 4th (ironically, given its association with the Star Wars franchise), I was intrigued to see a pair of tweets from @SansarOfficial and Second Life’s own Wurfi:

The Star Trek Tweets

A little more digging revealed the Tweets relate to an interesting Tidbit discovered by Sansar user and creator Gindipple: a weekly live Mission Log podcast by Roddenberry Entertainment. The podcasts, offered as both pre-recorded and “live” events exploring all aspect of Star Trek, from The Original Series through to the current Paramount film series and CBS’s Star Trek Discovery TV series.

This particular podcast, broadcast on May 1st, 2018, featured none other than Sansar’s Jason Gholston, who heads-up Linden Lab’s Sansar Studios team. Starting the 3 minute mark of the video, which I’ve time-stamped the link above, Jason revealed that Sansar Studios and Roddenberry Entertainment will be introducing a new Star Trek Experience to Sansar on May 22nd, 2018.

“Captain’s Log stardate….” – the iconic Captain’s chair on the original TV series starship Enterprise. Credit: Linden Lab, via Roddenberry Entertainment Inc.

The new experience, referred to as a “VR chat room”, is a 3D reproduction of the bridge of the USS Enterprise, NCC-1701 (“no bloody A, B, C, or D”, and Montgomery Scott famously stated around Stardate 46125.3, in the Next Generation episode Relics), as seen after the original series had been picked-up following the initial two pilot episodes.

I admit to getting goosebumps when watching the brief video clip of the design, and it is evident that a huge amount of care has been poured into this project: everything it presents from Kirk’s centre seat, through the conn and helm stations, to the stations occupied by Spock and Uhura and – when he was on the bridge – Scotty is perfectly reproduced, right down to the changing data displays and blinking lights. While not present in the video, I’ve little doubt the finished article will be enhanced by spatial loops of all the bridge sounds, deepening the overall immersion of the experience.

A look at one of the forward stations on the upper ring of the bridge. Credit: Linden Lab, via Roddenberry Entertainment Inc.

The core rendering for the experience has been produced by OTOY, working in collaboration with Sansar Studios and Roddenberry Entertainment. OTOY is the creator of the OctaneRenderer, and their work is currently featured in the opening title sequence of HBO’s stunning TV series Westworld.

The experience won’t be used to host the Mission Logs podcasts, but will give people the opportunity to hop into Sansar and view them via the main view screen and socially hang out afterwards, and Jason indicates that show hosts Ken Ray and / or John Champion may will be jumping into the experience immediately following the weekly Mission Log Live podcast, which go out every Tuesday at 19:00 Pacific Time / 22:00 Eastern time, USA.

The exchange between Jason and Ken and John is worth listening to beyond the Star Trek / Sansar news as between them, they nicely cover the “why” of Sansar ahead of getting into details of the new hangout itself – and yes, Second Life gets a positive mention, albeit it passing.

This initial exchange also hints that the new hangout is but the first aspect of what appears to be an evolving relationship:

So, we’re kind-of dancing around the big question here, which is what are we going to do? And we’re going to reveal part of that tonight; there’s another part coming somewhere down the road, and that has to do, potentially, with Star Trek Las Vegas …

– John Champion, Mission Log Live 024, May 1st 2018

Star Trek Las Vegas appears to be a reference to the Star Trek convention taking place in Las Vegas at the start of August 2018, and organised by Creation Entertainment. So might the convention include a Sansar presence, together with an expanded Star Trek Experience?

That would certainly be intriguing; not just in terms of what might be presented, but also in terms of how it fits with Linden Lab’s stated goal for 2018 to grow Sansar’s audience (and visibility). As such, I’m certainly going to be trying to keep my ear to the ground on this subject, not only in visiting the new Star Trek bridge experience in Sansar on or just after May 22nd, but also in trying to get a clearer picture on what is being planned and how it fits with this broader idea of trying to expand Sansar’s visibility and audience.

Addendum

Thanks to Wurfi’s work, I can now embed the podcast from YouTube, below – thanks, wurfi! To just directly to the Sansar coverage, click this link.

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With thanks to Wurfi and Gindipple.

Aech’s garage: a Sansar Ready Player One Experience

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage – click on any image for full size

Update, January 11th: following my enquiry concerning posting images of Aech’s Garage to the Lab, I received a reply from the Sansar community team, who also posted a  statement to the Sansar Discord channel, which I’m reproducing here, with the relevant comment highlighted for future reference by anyone positing images from Sansar:

We truly appreciate the ongoing support from the community, especially with all the excitement going on this week! We want to clarify that users are not discouraged from posting screenshots from any experience that is open to the public as long as there is no claim to exclusivity, early access, or other potentially misleading statements or claims that are untrue or could be construed as an official statement from Linden Lab or Sansar. We hope you all understand!

With this in mind, I’ve reposted the images in this article

Update: from the comments left by Ryan Schultz following this article, you can see there is something of a kerfuffle over whether or not images from the Aech’s Garage experience can be published. I have contacted Linden Lab on the matter, but have yet to receive a definitive reply one way or the other. To prevent further controversy, and while not having heard of any embargo myself, I have decided to remove the images in the post for the time being. 

Linden Lab recently unveiled two new experiences in Sansar, which I plan to look at in a broader piece on the platform later this week. However, one of them offers a particular attraction as a destination, so I’m leaping in with a look at it here as a part of my Exploring Sansar series.

Aech’s Garage is a joint collaboration between Linden Lab (via their Sansar Studios team), HTC, Intel, and Warner Brothers Entertainment to recreate the film set of Aech’s Garage from the upcoming Amblin Entertainment /  Village Roadshow Pictures film Ready Player One, the motion picture of Ernest Cline’s 2011 best seller.

In the novel and film, Aech (pronounced “H”) is best friend to Wade Watts, the novel’s protagonist – at least within OASIS, the two never having met face-to-face – who operates out of a basement location in the book. For the film, Aech’s base has been moved to a vast garage-cum-warehouse unit, and it is this space that has been recreated in Sansar with the formal title [HTC] Ready Player One – Aech’s Garage.

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage

For purists, the move might be seen as an annoyance and typical of Hollywood’s tinkering with adaptations for no readily apparent reason. From a visual perspective however – particularly if you are a film buff with a lean towards science fiction – the move is a treasure trove of sights. A long, comparatively narrow building, the garage is partially lit by a low Sun streaming in through the grime layered windows along one wall. This casts a good part of the experience into shadows which I suspect aren’t as quite as intrusive in VR mode as they can be when visiting in Desktop Mode. Klieg lights scattered around the building offer additional pools of light.

Entering via the Sansar Atlas spawns visitors at one of the building’s two ends, and from the start the level of detail is impressive. The lighting is very realistic, while the texturing and finish is superb. There are work bays, metal steps leading up to platforms and elevated work spaces, tools are scattered on work tops, bins, tyres and other detritus of an old working environment fill spaces and rise on tall racks standing against walls and windows. There even a bicycle is leaning against one wall – perhaps to offer someone a quick means to travel up the central aisle space of the building. Good use is also made of Sansar’s recently added audio materials: shoe heels click solidly on the cement floor, but footsteps ring hollowly as heels strike the metal steps when climbing up to or down from the raised platforms.

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage

But all this is just the apéritif, so to speak. The real feast lies in what can be found within this garage. Depending on which end of the building you spawn, you’ll find yourself either being watched by the Iron Giant from the 1999 film of the same name, or find yourself confronted by ED-209 from 1987’s Robocop – fortunately without its guns focusing on you with an ominous warning that you have 30 seconds to comply. The detail on both is superb, and the Iron Giant really gives a sense of scale. Split into two parts of upper body and head, with legs alongside, it is simply huge.

Nor are these the only models here. Sitting between them, down the sunlit side of the garage are a Mark 2 Viper from Battlestar Galactica (original and re-imagined), suspended from the roof alongside an Earth Defence Directorate fighter from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, and a maintenance pod from the United States spacecraft Discovery One, featured in Stanley Kubrick’s seminal movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage

Sitting under these, a little incongruously, is the prized 1961 Ferrari GT California Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) persuaded Cameron Frye (Alan Ruck) to snag the keys for from his father in the 1986 teen movie Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. While across the central aisle is a mechanoid loader of a similar kind to those seen in the Alien movies, with a model of Eagle 5 from Spaceballs suspended overhead.

As noted, the visual aspects of this experience are superb, in Desktop mode it leaps out at you, and I’ve little doubt that in VR it will look stunning. What is especially interesting about it is that it is a tie to a forthcoming major motion picture, due to be released on March 30th, 2018, and perhaps marks the first attempt to use Sansar in one of the market spaces where it could have some traction: marketing and PR. It demonstrates a potentially low-cost way of generating public interest in films, etc., by allowing people to not only see trailers and teasers from the comfort of their own home via social media and the likes of YouTube, but to also offer them the opportunity to visit locations from blockbuster films ahead of their release.

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage

In this particular case, it is entirely fitting that a film which might help promote wider interest in VR is gaining some degree of added promotion from VR. I’m curious to see if Linden Lab / Warner Brothers / HTC plan to do more with the experience between now and the US theatrical release of the film at the end of March 2018, particularly given the way the début – through the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, Las Vegas, courtesy of Intel – has been presented to the public at large.

Aceh’s Garage is without a doubt a powerful demonstration of Sansar’s potential, and a delight to visit. However, you plan to do so,  I’d perhaps suggest waiting until after CES 2018 closes on Friday, January 12th, 2018, as right now it is the subject Right now Aech’s Garage is tied to ongoing demonstrations of the HTC Vive at the show.While this is good for Sansar, it means that audio-wise there is a lot going on audio-wise within the experience, and it can get distracting with multiple overlapping conversations, even with Voice roll-off over distances. I frequently found myself getting caught between overlapping conversations and manually muting those I didn’t want to hear (including, I’d add, staff talking bugs and users over open microphones!).

Aech's Garage, Sansar; Inara Pey, January 2018, on FlickrSansar: Aech’s Garage

Experience SLurl

Hollywood Art Museum to open In Sansar with Star Wars event

Hollywood Art Museum. Credit: Linden Lab

The next instalment of the Star Wars film franchise opens in the United States on Friday, December 15th, 2017, in the form of Star Wars: The Last Jedi. However, on Saturday, December 9th, 2017, Star Wars fans will be able to enjoy a special Star Wars related treat in Sansar, when the virtual Hollywood Art Museum (HWAM) opens its doors to the public.

A joint endeavour between Sansar Studios and renowned director, designer, writer, producer, and practical effects professional, Greg Aronowitz, the Hollywood Art Museum is dedicated to the preservation and education of art used in entertainment.

Mr. Aronowitz – whose credits such as Jurassic Park: Lost World, X-Files, Saving Private Ryan, Contact, Terminator 2, and Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance – is an avid collector who has amassed an incredible collection of Hollywood production art, from storyboards to costume sketches, concept drawings, models, and more.

Greg Aronowitz

These pieces provide an intimate view into the creative process behind some of the world’s most beloved films, spanning a period from Citizen Kane to Transformers: The last Knight, and present a unique visual history of production art in Hollywood. Until now, his collection has been inaccessible to the general public – that changes with the launch of the Hollywood Art Museum.

The museum’s goal is to help new artists using digital mediums find fresh inspiration in the traditional arts of Hollywood’s past. Exhibits at HWAM will feature high-resolution images of the original drawings and paintings, as well as 3D models of production used sculptures, make-ups, miniatures, and tools.

To mark both the opening of the Museum, and in recognition of the upcoming new film in the Star Wars franchise, Mr Aronowitz will be hosting a private pop-up gallery on Saturday, December 9th, 2017 at one of Los Angeles’s oldest art supply stores. This location also happens to be where George Lucas’s visual effects company, Industrial Light And Magic, acquired many of the supplies used to create visual props and other elements used in the original Star Wars films.

The event will feature original physical art from the franchise, including the very first drawings made for the film franchise and never-before-seen production art from the first trilogy by Lucasfilm alumni Joe Johnston, Ralph McQuarrie, Phil Tippett, Drew Struzan, Colin Cantwell, and more.

In addition, there will be VR stations where attendees at this live event can visit the museum’s presence in Sansar. Then, during the week commencing Monday, December 11th, 2017, Greg Aronowitz will provide daily guided tours of the gallery, and there will be special surprise guests dropping in.

Sansar users will also be able to visit HWAM in Sansar from Saturday, December 9th, and join in with the celebrations, as well as being able to visit the museum any time thereafter.

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