The Hamptons in Second Life

The HAmptons; Inara Pey, April 2018, on FlickrThe Hamptons – click any image for full size

A homestead region designed by Haye Von Ayenhaha (Haye Aya), The Hamptons offers a taste of the great outdoors, inspired by Northern East Coast or Western European landscapes. It’s a photogenic location, with a rich mix of landscape, walks, hints of human presence and places for couples to enjoy.

The land is split into three long-fingered rocky islands, linked by high wooden bridges. The western most of these island is where the landing point is located, on the broken courtyard of a former piano factory. It shares the courtyard with the detritus of the factory, a little café-style space, and assorted vehicles. South of this is a private area of the island, with ban lines warning people to keep out – a sign and security orb might be more preferable, but that’s a minor point; the rest of the region is nicely open to exploration.

The HAmptons; Inara Pey, April 2018, on FlickrThe Hamptons

North of the old factory are board walks overlooking the ocean, places to sit and cuddle, and a bridge linking the western island with the middle one of the trio. A second board walk angles away from the bridge, offering a way down into the gorge separating the two islands, where a rowing boat offers another cuddle spot. It’s possible to walk along the edge of the water here – just mind the bushes! – but remember, the south end of the island is off-limits.

The middle island flows around a large rocky spine into which an old mine shift drills its way back to a large cavern. Paths snake around either side of this backbone, the one to the west leading to a little terrace garden connected by wooden steps and low bridge to the private house. The terrace with its green house and potted plants can be visited, but the bridge to the house is again off-limits.  The path on the east side of the island offers views towards the final island in the group, and a board walk build out from the cliffs courtesy of a sturdy scaffold. An old barn sits part-way around the path, and another cuddle spot sits at the end of it.

The HAmptons; Inara Pey, April 2018, on FlickrThe Hamptons

Reached via another bridge, the final island of the three offers a more open-topped plateau than the others, the trees here fewer, allowing for open rugged grass to carpet it under the sky. Again, an arc of board walks offers a view out over the sea to the east, a single wooden stairway leading down to a shoreline platform – note this is signposted as being reserved for women only! There’s a little bit of an oriental theme here – a little Japanese-style structure sits on the plateau while down on the shore of the channel between this and the middle island a larger house is under construction.

An interesting aspect of the region is that Haye has used a number of her own custom mesh builds to fit the design – notably the board walks and steps; this greatly add to the feeling that a good deal of care and attention has gone into the design.

The HAmptons; Inara Pey, April 2018, on FlickrThe Hamptons

The Hamptons is a delightfully uncomplicated region design, very photogenic under a range of windlights, and presenting visitors with a quiet place in which to pass the time. The construction work I spotted suggests the region is still evolving, so don’t be surprised if you find more than I’ve described here.

All told, a very pleasing and relaxing visit.

The HAmptons; Inara Pey, April 2018, on FlickrThe Hamptons

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