A return to Whimberly in Second Life

Whimberly, Whimberly; Inara Pey, August 2017, on Flickr Whimberly – click any image for full size

Caitlyn and I first visited Whimberly, the Homestead region designed by Staubi (Engelsstaub) in January of 2017. Back then, both of us were struck by the elegance and serenity of the region. So seeing it back in the Destination Guide with an updated image suggesting a make-over, had us hopping back at the start of August for another look; and it was well worth it.

The landing point to the north-east of the region places visitors outside a flat-roofed summer-house surrounded on three sides by an ornate wall while the fourth sports a wooden deck build out over the water. Cosily and elegantly furnished, the house suggests a summer getaway or a lover’s tryst.

Whimberly, Whimberly; Inara Pey, August 2017, on Flickr Whimberly

An old fountain sits alongside this summer-house, birds chirping happily (or perhaps in a demand for food!) while hopping along the retaining wall, while beyond the fountain, a stone arch provides access to one of several seating areas suitable for individual visitors or couples, all of which are scattered far enough apart from one another to offer a sense of seclusion.

A stream, crossed by three bridges, dissects the land into two halves of unequal size. The northern part with the landing point, offers a walk east and south, passing both the seating spot mentioned above and then another, further to the east, before the smallest of the three bridges provide a means to rejoin the larger part of the land. Westwards, past a wooden jetty were one can rez a little motor boat to putter along the stream, the land turns hilly.

Whimberly, Whimberly; Inara Pey, August 2017, on Flickr Whimberly

A grassy path climbs the gentle slopes of the hill, revealing an old barn looking to the north-west and overlooking a tiny islet where a picnic awaits on the far side of the little rope bridge. The grassy trail then continues southwards between the shoulder of the hill and the water to where another bridge – this one crafted from the interlocked trunks of two trees –  crosses the stream and offers access to a grand house.

With a paved courtyard, terrace to the rear, the house presents an idyllic place to live, the full height conservatory to the rear offering a magnificent view. Board walks point the way to where a deck extends out over the waters of a bay which cuts deeply into the land. A humpbacked finger of land points back to the north-eat from the house, and visitors can follow the grassy walk along the flank of its slope above the stream, or walk along its ridged back to where another cosy snuggle point sits within the ruins of an old tower, and stone step present a route up to the highest point on the island.

Whimberly, Whimberly; Inara Pey, August 2017, on Flickr Whimberly

A stylish barn conversion sit at the top of the hill, offering a view to the south and west, back towards the big house. Shaded by fir trees and with the peak of the hill just behind it, it sits as a cosy café where a break from exploring can be enjoyed. For the adventurous, a zip line offers a rapid descent to the little farmstead in the south-eastern corner of the land,  located not far from where another summer-style house is built out over the waters surrounding the island.

Set within the confines of surrounding hills, Whimberly sits as an island on a lake somewhere – I’d say at least – deep in Europe. A place to while away the summer days and unwind from the demands of everyday life; where nothing really matters other than the presence of nature around you.

Whimberly, Whimberly; Inara Pey, August 2017, on Flickr Whimberly

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