Time Remains in Second Life

Time Remains, October 2020 – click any image for full size
Travel through Time along a beach side woodland.

So reads the description for Time Remains, the Hometead region held and designed by Aura (Akiko Tripsa). It’s a place we dropped into back in September (thanks, again, to the pointer from Shawn Shakespeare), but which I’ve just got around to writing about – so my apologies to Aura for the delay.

Time Remains, October 2020

Bracketed in a couple of corners by curtains of rock, the setting is generally low-lying and split into three islands, two of which lie to the east side of the region and run north-to south, separated by a narrow channel of water. The third occupies the south-western side of the region, a bay of restless water to its north.

A small south-facing headland on the southernmost of the east side islands is home to the landing point, a large gazebo offering group information and a nearby sign informing you that you’re about to enter someone’s dream. Pass through an arch beyond the sign, and you’ll find yourself in an area enigmatically called Past – the remaining islands forming Present and Future.

Time Remains, October 2020

To what these labels might refer is open to personal interpretation. Could they designed to trigger thoughts of our own lives and relationship? Are they more general labels simply to distinguish the three islands, or do they have more of a personal meaning for Aura? These are questions that visitors might ponder as they wander under the shade of trees, over the short grass and  along the occasional paved roads and paths.

Certainly, there is nothing specific is terms of décor that might tie one of the islands to its label – Present, for example, has a building that his hints of the 1960s and 70’s about it, while Future is firmly rooted in the décor found throughout all three islands. All of this adds to the enigmatic attractiveness to the region as a whole.

Time Remains, October 2020

Buildings lie scattered across all three islands, some in better condition than others. They all offer multiple places to hang-out when visiting, each uniquely dressed with its own identity. Some appear to  mix periods, as noted above, others lie as simple places to sit and cuddle with a few added accoutrements of comfort, still others of suggestions place places in regular use – artists’ corners and the like. All are engaging in their design and set out in such a way that even when two or three are gathered together, the spirit of privacy sits between them.

The beach mentioned in the About Land description skirts the edges of the two eastern islands, forming a ribbon along one and almost encircling the other. Comprising shingle rather than sand, it forms a natural edge to both islands that neatly separates their green coast with a colder cast of the waters around them without being too bright a marker of the division, as might be the case were it to be sandy in nature.

Time Remains, October 2020

While bushes may in places indicate set routes through parts of the islands, together with ladders focusing visitors towards certain points when move between different elevations in the slightly undulating landscape, this is really a place where the feet can pretty much carry you where they will.  This is turn allows for natural discoveries to be made along the way – such as the field of aged pianos – to be made quite naturally. Not even the short stretches of road and sidewalk found with some of the buildings demand people necessarily follow them. Thus, Time Remains invites open and free-form exploration, the individual buildings an locations found throughout not only offering places to sit and pass the time, but also for photography and posing.

Engaging, photogenic, rich in small details that catch the eye, Time Remains makes for an ideal visit for both the Second Life explorer and photographer.

Time Remains, October 2020

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