The natural beauty of Oh Deer in Second Life

Oh Deer; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Oh Deer – click on any image for full size

Update, January 25th: Oh Deer has sadly closed, and Bambi is apparently taking a leave of absence from Second Life.

We made an early return visit to Oh Deer, the Homestead region designed Bambi (NorahBrent), after receiving news from both Miro Collas and Shakespeare that the region had been given a makeover.

Our first visit to the region was made in October 2017, when we found it to be rich in autumn’s charms, offering a mix of buildings and open spaces visitors were welcome to wander in and through. Returning in mid-January 2018, we found that not only has it been redesigned, but the clock has also marched forward, the environment settings perhaps suggesting a late spring morning; a time when the sky hasn’t quite made up its mind whether or not to let the sun in all its glory, but the air is warm enough to raise a morning mist from dew and stream.

Oh Deer; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Oh Deer

In this iteration of the region, buildings are conspicuous by their absence; not a single house or shop or any other permanent structure is to be found. Instead the land, split by a meandering stream, is given over entirely to nature, rich and greens and browns, with animals, plants and birds adding their own splashes of colour.

From the landing point alongside the single bridge spanning the quiet waters of the stream, visitors are free to wander where they please. Whether this be southwards, along the meandering track pointing away from the bridge, or north over the bridge to where the same track arcs around to take its own winding route south along the far side of the stream, is entirely a matter of choice. Or, if preferred, visitors can strike off the trails, and wander through knee-high grass and between the trunks of tall trees to where the mist hugs the ground, adding an ethereal feel to the landscape.

Oh Deer; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Oh Deer

Across the land can be heard the sounds of birds, crickets and the rat-a-tat of a woodpecker busy drumming on the stump of a fallen tree.   Squirrels frolic on the ground near the landing point, while fallow deer wander under the branches of trees, their coats as dappled as the sunlight filtering through the canopy of leaves overhead. Further afield, foxes might be seen, while cormorants , osprey, turtles and bear can be found scattered along the banks of the stream as it winds through the land.

This is, in a word, a tranquil setting; a place perfect for finding a little peace and forgetting the hustles and toils of life. To encourage people to tarry a while, picnic baskets sit on benches to one side of the landing point, while a little camp site hides behind the bowl of a tree on the other. It would be nice to perhaps have a couple of places visitors might rest further out from the landing point, where the peace of nature and the playfulness of foxes or rabbits or the wandering of deer might be observed, but this is a minor point.

Oh Deer; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Oh Deer

Simple and elegant in this iteration, Oh Deer offers a charming rip into the countryside, one suited to being seen in the cool spring light in which it is set, or under the blue skies of summer – as I’ve done with some of the images here. As always, photos can be submitted to the region’s Flickr group.

SLurl Details

  • Oh Deer (Heavenly Waters, rated: Moderate)
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