Returning to It’s A New Dawn in Second Life

It's A New Dawn, Lemon Beach; Inara Pey, January 2017, on FlickrIt’s A New Dawn, Lemon Beach – click any image for full size

In December I visited Silvermoon Fairey’s lovely A Painter’s Link (see here), and her two seasonal settings, 50 Words for Snow (which is located over A Painter’s Link) and December Will Be Magic Again (an wrote about both here), located over her other region design, It’s a New Dawn. As I last visited the latter in November 2015, it seemed logical that I start my 2017 Second Life travels by making a return, and in doing so complete a tour of Silvermoon’s settings.

At the time of my last visit, It’s a New Dawn presented a rugged, rural island settings which in some respects put me in mind of the Scottish islands. Since then, and unsurprisingly, much has changed; however, the rural look and rugged feel to the region remains, although the location now might be somewhat closer to the Mediterranean than the North Sea.

It's A New Dawn, Lemon Beach; Inara Pey, January 2017, on FlickrIt’s A New Dawn, Lemon Beach

Visitors arrive on a small sand cove at the base of a high rocky table. The beach and cover are watched over by the  study, brick-built tower of a lighthouse close by. Reached via a path zigzagging its way up the face of the rock, an old farmhouse occupies the top of the table, presenting a commanding view of the region as it is spread out to the east and south, a second twisting path leading back down to the lands below.

However, if you’re not in the mood for a climb, following the sands of the cove southwards around the base of the rock will bring you to a track which heads east and inland. It passes over a gently undulating pastoral setting where sheep and cows graze, skirting around the shoulder of rock to pass between the tall stems of sunflowers. Beyond these, it joins with the track leading away from the path coming down from the high plateau, pointing the way to an old stone bridge crossing a meandering steam.

It's A New Dawn, Lemon Beach; Inara Pey, January 2017, on FlickrIt’s A New Dawn, Lemon Beach

It is on the far side of the bridge that things take more of a Mediterranean turn. Cypress trees stand in neatly regimented lines along track and field edge, while Tuscan styled villas sit on lower, flat-topped hills or alongside the water’s edge.  Bales of hay, neatly rolled, are scattered across the landscape, as are places to sit and enjoy the view, while horses wander, enjoying the light grazing.

All of this sits under the gaze of a great stone tower anchored to another rocky plateau to the north-east, facing the old farm across the valley between the two. Behind this tower, which is also reached by twisting track and path, the land marches to the south as a series of humped hills and rocky climbs, shoulders sheltering the villas and fields below. These hills turn westward in their march, dipping briefly through more pastures only to rise to a high knuckle of rock crowned by a great and aged tree.

It's A New Dawn, Lemon Beach; Inara Pey, January 2017, on FlickrIt’s A New Dawn, Lemon Beach

With offshore islands, a further beach to the south-east and plenty of places to sit and enjoy the sights and sounds, all held beneath the soft glow of a westering sun (top and bottom images), It’s A New Dawn remains an eye-catching visit. For me it was the perfect start for my 2017 wanderings; should you also enjoy your visit, please consider making a donation towards the upkeep of the region so others might also enjoy it.

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One thought on “Returning to It’s A New Dawn in Second Life

  1. Pingback: Simploring 2017 (1) – Silvermoon Fairey’s sims | Diomita and Jenny Maurer's Blog

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