SL12B: Ebbe Altberg on Second Life & Sansar – transcript and video

Ebbe and Saffia get ready for the discussion (Jo was off-line at this point)
Ebbe and Saffia get ready for the discussion (Jo was off-line at this point)

On Friday, June 26th, Linden Lab CEO Ebbe Altberg faced questions from Saffia Widdershins, Jo Yardley and the audience in the last of the Meet the Lindens series sponsored by Prim Perfect.

The session lasted just over the hour, after initial teething problems in getting everything working, in which he addressed a wide range of question on both Second Life and Sansar, and offered-up some information of his own.

The following is a transcript of the event, based on a video by Chakat Northspring, which is embedded at the end of this article. My thanks, as always, to North. The official video will be available in due course via the Prim Perfect website.

Are there any things that have changed since you’ve been in charge that you are especially proud about?

[0:01:04] There’s a number of things. I think primarily it’s the relationship between the Lab and residents., I think is much better today. It was a little bit tense, I would say, the relationship, when I came on board; and it seems to be much more casual and fun and collaborative. And I think many of you have seen  more of us than you had for a while previously.

I’m also proud of the quality of the product. The performance, we’ve made lots of strides, the quality; [group] chat had lots of issues. So we’ve made a lot of progress on just making it a more stable product, a better performing product.

And I’m also proud of the focus we have at the Lab. When I came aboard, there were quite a few projects sprinkled about, and today I feel we have what I call four very strong focus areas with really good drive across each of them. So it feels like a healthier environment, not just between us and residents, but also amongst us Lindens, and a better quality product, and a better focused organisation. So I’m pleased with the progress.

Can you tell us what those four areas of concentration are?

[0:02:56] Obviously, continued to improve Second Life is something that we do. And you guys often hear from Oz and Danger on our progress there. We have Blocksworld; a fairly small team working on this neat little app for a younger audience to be able to build virtual experiences on the iPad. We have obviously a very huge investment in Project Sansar, our next generation experience platform, and we’ve worked really hard for over a year now, and we’ll start to get some external customers on-board in just a month or so. Just a few, but it’s great progress.

And the forth one, I would say, is compliance; making sure we run a tight ship when it comes to the linden dollar and who can cash out, and just running a tight ship when it comes to compliance … whether that’s fraud controls, identity controls – a number of things we need to do to make sure we and banks are comfortable with the business that takes place in Second Life.

So those are the four areas of focus.

The last thing you said about cashing out. You’ve said before that you want to speed that up. [do you have] any idea when this is going to happen, or how is the progress to that?

[0:04:39] The progress is good. We’ve now managed to automate a lot of things so that we can see what percentage we would be willing to pay out rapidly in an automated fashion. We’re still tuning the rules as to who we would trust to pay out; to make sure that we’re 100% certain that people who would be paid out should be paid out. And we continue to increase that percentage by continuing to dial the rules and make tweaks,

When we get to a significant enough percentage, then we should be able to start automating the process as well. not just the data saying we could, but we actually will pay out. I don’t have a date for exactly when we can turn that on; but it’s our goal for the vast majority of people that we have a trusted relationship with, to be able to pay within 24 hours or something.

I mean, there’s obviously external processes a well, that we’re not 100% in control of; but on our end, when someone clicks the button that says, “I want to be paid out”, we hope to, within 24 hours, to be able to automatically say, “start the process”, and then like I say, there’s actually some external dependencies for how quickly that actually takes place.

I think it’s interesting that you’ve given on compliance an equal status with the other three projects.

[0:06:14] Well, I wouldn’t say they’re all equal; but it’s a focus area, and it’s very important for us to run a trusted, large-scale business, to make sure that fraud cannot take place. For the sake of us as a business, as well as for the sake of you not having bad things go on. So it is an important aspect.

Danger Linden was actually saying that it’s one of Linden Lab’s advantages coming into Sansar, because all the new virtual worlds that are planning to come on-line, and you’ve got to get this right, and you have a head start.

Ebbe-6_001[0:06:59] Yeah, we are pretty much alone in having had a virtual currency with a floating exchange with cash-out and all these capabilities. There’s no-one else like it. so yes, we have a pretty significant leg-up compared to others if your intent is to have a virtual economy as we do. I mean, there are other business models that one could apply, but the way we are doing it, there’s no-one else really doing it as well as we do. And so that’s something we’ll certainly leverage; both operational experience and [the] technology, as we move forward with Sansar.

Second Life still gets some negative feedback in the media, although it seems like it’s become a lot less recently … but which kind of negative feedback do you pick-up [on], both in the media and form people in second Life themselves, that annoys you the most.

[0:08:15] Well, it’s not that much that annoys me … I’ve only had the opportunity to hear negativity for about a year … but I hear very little of it. whomever I talk to, it’s mostly … surprise that it’s still around, or more neutral. It’s very rarely that I’ll run into people that start off with the negative. So that’s a very small percentage of the population. Usually the negative people tend to be quite loud, but it’s not something I stress about.

I guess my biggest annoyance is people intolerance for various types of content. and when you look at the content in the real world, and people’s tolerance for that content in the real world. Then suddenly, when it’s in a virtual space, then it’s, “Oh my God!” Then there’s like a different level of acceptance for all kinds of content for some reason.

And that annoys me. So whatever the subject matter is, I can always draw a parallel to how it’s always “so much worse”, or it has just as much interesting stuff going on in the real world as in Second Life, whether it’s art, whether it’s sex, whether it’s whatever it is, all of this stuff is all around us in the real world, so why would it not be completely reasonable and acceptable to also have it in a virtual world. That’s maybe the most annoying part; when people don’t get that.

I know that your family have come into Second Life as well, and you actually have a family home here in Second Life and have actually had that for some time before you became CEO. So presumably, they get Second Life as well. But when you talk to friends … when they’re new to it, how do you explain what your job is?

[0:10:31] Well, it sort-of depends a little bit on the context of whom I’m trying to explaining it to; and it also really depends on their experience with various things. Bit generic when I explain that we’re trying to create a three-dimensional canvas that users can chose how to fill it, and how to populate it with what type of experiences, and that we want to create as much freedom as possible to allow people to create as much stuff as they can imagine.

So, kind-of suggesting that in something like Second Life, you can be whatever you want and do whatever you want and create whatever you want, as long as it’s legal and as long as it’s somewhat appropriate for the rest of us.

But then you can go into the incredible breadth of things that are really already working so well in Second Life; whether it’s education, health, art, role-playing. There’s almost as much variety of hobbies and interests and creations and experiences in something like Second Life like people can enjoy in their real lives.

So yeah, sometimes it’s tricky because it’s so broad. It’s so many different things to so many different people. So usually in a conversation, you usually have to figure-out what is of interest to the other person and figure-out how to relate to them with subject matter that they can get into or understand. And that’s part of the challenge of trying to explain something that’s so broad, because it’s obviously easier to explain a product that is narrow in its application or focus. So it’s usually a bit of dialogue that usually makes it easier than just a simple statement; it’s hard to think of a simply statement that sort-of captures it all for everybody.

Have you had a chance to Look around SL12B yet?

[0:12:50] I was around, I think it was two days ago. I was probably in there about half an hour or so; so I didn’t get too deep into too many things. but I really enjoyed some techno music over in the corner somewhere for a while. saw some fascinating art and creations, all kinds of interesting music, but not really enough time to have a chance to see all of it.

Many Lab staffers have been exploring SL12B and enjoying themselves
Many Lab staffers have been exploring SL12B and enjoying themselves

Continue reading “SL12B: Ebbe Altberg on Second Life & Sansar – transcript and video”

Advertisements

Second Life project updates 26/1: server, avatar rendering

The DECADES event  - Saturday, June 27th, 2015 only - details here
The Decades event – Saturday, June 27th, 2015 only – details here

Server Deployments

  • There was no scheduled deployment to the Main (SLS) channel on Tuesday, June 23rd
  • On Wednesday, June 24th, all three  RC channels were updated with the same new server maintenance project, which included a fix for BUG-197, “Cannot See My Chat Only In My Region / Region Bad Performance” (not open to public viewing) and internal simulator fixes. As pointed out in the comments, this deploy was actually rolled back; I had forgotten to re-check the deployment page between originally drafting the first part of this article and publishing it.

The chat issue is a problem whereby a user can’t see any of their local chat on a region or parcel, and nor can anyone else due to a scripted object which is spamming chat so badly, the chat throttle kicks in, blocking their chat. However, no message would be provided to inform the user this was the case; with the change deployed on Tuesday, the user will now get a message about the chat throttle being hit, but unfortunately, the system will not identify the spammy object (so it might be removed, if you own it / the the rights to return it).

Avatar Complexity and Avatar Rendering in Busy Regions

Avatar Rendering in Busy Regions

During the Simulator User Group meeting on Tuesday, June 23rd, Simon Linden hinted that as well as the upcoming Avatar Complexity feature for which I recently gave a rapid overview, there are other options the Lab might consider in order to lighten the rendering load created by avatars:

We may experiment with a similar setting for crowds … setting a limit on the number of avatars we do any attempt at rendering.   In other words, if you were at a region with 75 people in view, and it was set for a limit of 64, you’d only get 64.  The remaining ones just wouldn’t be there in any form, similar to turning off avatars with ctrl-alt-shift-4.

He then went on:

That’s just an experimental idea now. To really make it better in a crowd, we’d probably want the server interest list to know and then it wouldn’t send you those updates.

As we’ve seen, the Interest list isn’t the easiest thing to play around with, so it’ll be interesting to see which, if either, of these ideas might be pursued.

Avatar Complexity

In terms of Avatar Complexity, questions have already been asked if the upper limit is adequate. With the test viewer, the Avatar Complexity slider runs from a value of 19,999 (which pretty much that no other avatars will render in your world view) means pretty much no other avatars will render in your field-of-view) through to 300K, above which sits “No Limit”, which means any avatar will render.

However, the suggestion has been made that the upper limit should perhaps be increased to allow for those who want to render particularly complex avatars used by friends. Responding to this, Oz Linden said, “It wouldn’t be hard to make the range somewhat wider, but at some point the control becomes too hard to use because each pixel is too big a jump.”

One issue that the new Avatar Complexity capability will not prevent (although, strictly speaking, it’s not designed to) is that it will not prevent worn mesh crashers impacting the viewer, because while the avatar is not actually rendered, the data on what is being worn still gets loaded into memory, and it is this that is used to crash things. Commenting on this, Simon linden said, “That sounds like something that should be looked at … if we can avoid loading that data, it would help everything.” Commenting on this, Oz Linden added:

There are a number of available optimisations; among them, using the complexity information from others to just pre-emptively not even fetch the appearance info for an avatar.

So again, it will be interesting to see what might come to pass in the future, should the Lab take this work up as well.