Sea Brook’s haven in Second Life

Sea Brook, April 2020 – click any image for full size

A full region using the full region land capacity bonus, Sea Brook is a remarkable setting that offers a stunning location that forms a rich, eye-catching, highly-photogenic haven of a destination that offers a tour de force of what can be achieved with vision and considered execution in region design in Second Life.

The work of Muira (Angelique Vanness) on behalf of Rahnn Parker (Rahnn) and Carrie Parker (Cari2017), the region is a tour de force demonstration of Muira’s remarkable eye for region design, something I first noted in 2019 after visiting Season’s Cove (now closed, but see The magic of Season’s Cove in Second Life). As with that design, this is one that again feels far bigger than its 256m on a side size. In this instance, the sense of size and space is made all that more remarkable by the fact that much of the centre of the region is given open to open water.

Sea Brook, April 2020

The water takes the form of an extensive lake fed by falls that drop from a massive up-thrust of rock that rises to the north-east of the region in great granite or basalt blocks, topped by high fir trees. A broad, paved footpath winds its way around the lake’s shoreline in a loop, connecting three small terraces that thrust their own out into the clear blue waters. One of these terraces  forms the regions landing point, whilst all three present impressive views over the lake. At one end, this footpath connects to an imposing lodge that whilst grand in size, utterly fits with its surroundings. To the other end the path gives way to a rocky path – one of two in fact – that switch-backs up to the top of the high plateau.

Between the lake and the waters beyond the edge of the region, the land is entirely-low-lying with the exception to the huge plateau. Theses lowlands are rich is detail and  – if I might use the term again – present an expansive setting. Rich in tall Scots pines, they are marked by gravel tracks that run around the outside of the paved path around the lake, the woodlands between pavement and gravel cut through with winding trails that allow visitors to wander and discover all that lies under the shade of the trees: ponds, little camp sites, a children’s playground, picnic spots – the list is extensive without – the setting ever feeling crowded.

Sea Brook, April 2020

The paths also provide links to other locations within the region. These include a west side beach, tucked between two headlands. One of these is home to the ruins of an ancient church that now offers a cosy retreat. A second, intact chapel forms a book-end to the ruins, sitting on a low hills on the other headland, resting atop a low hill that allows it to look north across the beach towards the ruins of its companion.

East and south, behind the great lodge – which appears to be open to the public and itself offers an impressive place to explore – the land opens a little as at sits between rocky highlands and a growth of mangroves that surround one of the smaller islands sitting just off the coast. This little island is home to an old gazebo that offers a place to dance. Across the narrow channel separating the gazebo from the lodge, sits a little fenced meadow, a place where visitors can rez a horse to ride around the region – something that is well worth doing.

Sea Brook, April 2020

Atop the plateau there is yet more to discover, the switched paths leading up to it connected one to the other by gravel trails that wind across the plateau, separating the woodlands to offer obvious paths for people (and horses) to follow and which take visitors past table-top games, and along an arched path to another dance area that offers an elven theme.

As with the lands below, the plateau is also cris-crossed by wooded paths that reveal more secrets among the trees, and which I’m not going to spoil by mentioning here. However, I will say that look carefully enough and you will find a zipline that runs down to the little finger-like island rising from the middle of the lake and where bumper boats can be rezzed by those looking for a little fun.

Sea Brook, April 2020

Nor is this all; below the plateau, and nestled in the roots of the cliffs, are wooden doors awaiting discovery. They lead to a network of tunnels and chambers that run through the rocks from on side to the other. With paved floors and faced stone walls, these tunnels and the halls and rooms that open off of them make for an intriguing point of exploration on their own; one looks like a former wine cellar, others present more intimate spaces.

A truly stunning design, Sea Brook is absolute perfectly set within the encircling region surround of high mountain peaks that – with the right windlight – give it tremendous depth, this is not a setting to be missed. It has a huge amount to discover (I’ve only scratched the surface here), and is finished with a matching sound scape.

Sea Brook, April 2020

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