Enjoying some Snow Falls in Second Life

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrSnow Falls – click any image for full size

It’s been a while since we’ve visited a region design by Elyjia (Elyjia Baxton) and Brayan Friller (Brayan26 Friller), so when Shakespeare passed me the LM to Snow Falls, we were delighted to hop over and explore.

As the name suggests, this is a winter region, a Homestead designed to look like a small island sitting within a bay of icy-looking water. Clouds scud across the sky, as if in a hurry to get somewhere, remaining overhead just long enough to drop snow as they scurry on their way. Or perhaps the falling flakes are actually snow blown free from the surrounding high mountain peaks, then left to find their way down to the ground as the wind set them free.

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrSnow Falls

A cobbled waterfront sits on the shoulders of neatly lain bricks, the edge guarded by tall railings set between brick pillars to avoid the risk of anyone falling into the frigid waters below. This little lane – it is barely more than that – is  home to a nest of little businesses that have perhaps seen busier times as they look out across the water (these actually offer gacha resales for those interested).

To the north, just beyond one set of gates guarding the shops, the land climbs up to where a barn and chapel occupy the hilltop, a tall water tower rising between them. the blanket of snow is rutted by the tracks left by an old flat-bed truck they appears to have been puttering back and forth – perhaps delivering Santa and his gifts to the barn.

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrSnow Falls

A second set of tracks at the foot the hill lead to what might be the farmhouse associated with the hilltop barn.  Cats are playing close by, outside another barn while a horse looks on.

Go south along the shop fronts to the second set of gates and the land again opens up, snow-laden fir trees pointing the way towards a small stone bridge connecting to one of three further islands making up the region. It is home to a pavilion offering a break from the weather, and which is watched over by the lighthouse sitting on the neighbouring small island.

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrDagger Bay – click any image for full size

This is a flat-topped square of rock rising from frigid waters, the finger of the lighthouse giving fair warning that the waters around the rock can be dangerous – a fact underlined by the wreck of a trawler lying close by, deck canted over, ice forming around it.

The remaining island lies to the north, close to the farm. A single, empty cabin sits on it, a sail boat close by suggesting it might occasionally see use.

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrSnow Falls

For those seeking places to relax and appreciate the views, there are a number to be found – in the Pavilion, in a couple of arbours, out on the water, courtesy of a rowing boat – and even up on a couple of balloons floating above the farm, as well as on benches to be found on the waterfront outside of the shops and scattered around the region in the snow.

There are one or two small rough edges to the regions – the odd floating tree or snowman – but nothing that really interferes with the overall lay of the land or the opportunity for taking photos. For those who do enjoy photography, the regions a Flick group for sharing pictures.

Snow Falls; Inara Pey, November 2018, on FlickrSnow Falls

All told, another picturesque region by Elyjia and Brayan, and well in keeping with the time of the year in the northern hemisphere.

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