Cece’s Secret in Second Life

Cece's Secret; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Cece’s Secret – click on any image for full size

I was drawn to Cece’s Secret, a homestead region designed by CeCeGy, as a result of seeing it as an Editor’s Pick in the Destination Guide. For those still keen to enjoy winter themes, it currently offers a snowy environment which makes for a pleasing visit and a charming location with hints of romance.

A visit starts on the largest of five islands, and almost at the centre of the region. This island is home to a parade of shops facing a railway station terminus, a single track curving out of the station to vanish into a tunnel. A train is halted before the awning of the station – which is just as well; the smoke stack of the engine is taller than the steel frame of the awning, so any attempt to go any further might have been damaging to both. Instead, the train sits under the early morning sky, a small square alongside the track.

Cece's Secret; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Cece’s Secret

A café sits on the square, a frozen pond nearby, reached via a set of gates. Further to the east, beyond the rocks rising from the ground beyond the pond, sits a whitewashed cabin with roaring fire outside and an interior setting suitable for newly weds and the romantic at heart. With the ground covered in snow, a path marked by small rocks winds its way around the shops and down to the south to where two bridges span narrow channels to the nearer two of the four southern islands.

Of the two islands reached via these bridges, one is a rocky outcrop. Stone steps curl up the snow and rock to where a large tower rises, inviting people to explore. With its walls holed and its turret broken, this tower still offers another cosy retreat. Across the water the second island is lower, flatter. Reached via a low bridge, it is home to another comfortable cabin facing a vagabond trailer across another frozen pond.

Cece's Secret; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Cece’s Secret

The remaining two islands sit further out and are far more rugged in nature; one on the edge of the region and deserted; the second – which appears to be only reachable by flying – is also rugged, with a garden cottages sitting on the top of it, again making presenting another comfortable escape from the rest of the world.

There is one more accessible offshore point; not so much an island as a tiny islet on the west side of the region. Reached by a little iron bridge, and devoid of trees, it offers a bed under a canopy, while a deck with seats and burning brazier faces it from across the region on the east side.

Cece's Secret; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Cece’s Secret

There are one or two little issues with the design, but nothing to spoil the overall setting. There are some gates that don’t open, for example, but can easily be walked around, while one or two plants could do with being phantom. Do note, as well, that scripts are disabled; so if you re-log whilst visiting, you many find any scripted AO you use and scripted attachments may not work as expected.

It’s important to note that these are own little issues, and they don’t spoil a visit. As such, were I to use one word to describe Cece’s Secret, it might be placid. The winter set to the region, coupled with the surrounding mountains, the region has a feeling of being a secluded place; somewhere to escape to and relax. As well as the cabins and the bed on its islet, there are numerous places to sit and relax or cuddle.

Cece's Secret; Inara Pey, January 2018, on Flickr Cece’s Secret

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