Tavana Island’s autumnal beauty in Second Life

Tavana Island; Inara Pey, October 2017, on FlickrTavana Island – click any image for full size

I was drawn to suggest Tavana Island as a place Caitlyn and I should explore on the basis it is designed by Brayan Friller (Brayan26 Friller) and Elyjia (Elyjia Baxton). They were the couple behind the gorgeous Au Petit Jour (see here for more) and The Heart of the Sea (see here for more), so I was keen to see what they had cooked up with their latest design. As it turned out, we weren’t the only ones: digging into my inventory I found Shakespeare and Max had also sent me a landmark for the region!

If there is a word to sum-up Tavana Island, it has to be “exquisite”. This is a place we and I arrived in with the intention of having a leisurely exploratory wander – and ended up spending the better part of our evening within. It’s also a place with strong echoes of Heart of the Sea – so much so, that it was easy to imagine we’d just sailed from there aboard the schooner anchored offshore, popping over the horizon to arrive at Tavana Island and then row ourselves to shore via one of the rowing bows moored down by the beach.

Tavana Island; Inara Pey, October 2017, on FlickrTavana Island

Visitors arrive on the largest – by far – of five rugged islands. It sits towards the north-east of the region,   four of the remaining islands sweeping in an arc from west to south around it. The landing point is set close to the southern cliffs of the island, near a set of iron gates. These point the way to a set of wooden steps leading down to the beach, which looks out towards the southern isles in the group, while a gravel path runs from the leading point in the other direction, offering a route around the major sites of interest on the island.

The most obvious of these is the Tuscan villa a short distance from the landing point.  This might be a holiday home or farm-house (there is a barn nearby and both horses and sheep grazing on the island). It looks out over the waters to the north, where two outcrops of rock rise from the sea, like sentinels standing guard.

Tavana Island; Inara Pey, October 2017, on FlickrTavana Island

A short distance way along the path from the house is a little cuddle spot and an old chapel, while those following the path from the landing point to the villa might be tempted to turn aside and take the little junction leading the way up to a grassy plateau on the south side of the island. There is a gazebo here, complete with a dance machine (with another machine out on the grass) – and the audio stream featuring music from films makes for a perfect time dancing.

I’m not certain if either of the two islands to the south which show signs of habitation are open to the public – there is no direct way to reach them. With Au Petit Jour, Elyjia and Brayan did set a small island off to one side for private use, so this might be the case here. I haven’t been able to check with them if this is the case here, so it might be better to view them from afar rather than risk unintended intrusion. There’s certainly opportunities to this, either from the sun loungers on the sand or from the rowing boats moored by the little pier at the beach, or from the grassy plateau mentioned above.

Tavana Island; Inara Pey, October 2017, on FlickrTavana Island

There is a natural beauty to Tavana Island which makes it an absolute delight not just to visit, but to spend time enjoying, be it sitting (on land or in a rowing boat), dancing, or simply wandering and looking. There’s a subtle sound scape perfectly matching the seasonal look for the islands, so keep local sounds enabled.

All told, another superb design by Brayan and Elyjia, one more than worth time to visit. Should you do so, and enjoy your time as much as we did, please consider a donation towards the upkeep of the region for others to enjoy as well.

Tavana Island; Inara Pey, October 2017, on FlickrTavana Island

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