Seanchai Library Comes to Holly Kai Park

Seanchai Library, Holly Kai Park

It’s time to kick-off another week of storytelling in Voice by the staff and volunteers at the Seanchai Library. As always, all times SLT, and events are held at the Library’s new home at Holly Kai Park, unless otherwise indicated.

I’m absolutely delighted to see Seanchai at the Park, becoming part of our family and helping to expand our support of the arts in second Life. The familiar programme of weekly storytelling from Seanchai will continue via their new headquarters at the park, while they’ll also be able to run special events using the park’s grounds and our sky platforms.

So, without further ado, here’s the first week of events from Seanchai Library.

Sunday, June 25th, 13:30: Tales of Ships, the Sea and Other Wetness

Join Library staff and guests in a celebratory 90-minute event to launch their new season at their new home at Holly Kai Park .

Monday, June 26th 19:00: The Book of Skulls

Gyro Muggins reads Robert Silverberg’s novel.

Four friends, college room-mates, go on a spring break trip to Arizona: Eli, the scholar, who found and translated the book; Timothy, scion of an American dynasty, born and bred to lead; Ned, poet and cynic; and Oliver, the brilliant farm boy obsessed with death.

Somewhere in the desert lies the House of Skulls, where a mystic brotherhood guards the secret of eternal life. There, the four aspirants will present themselves–and a horrific price will be demanded.

For immortality requires sacrifice. Two victims to balance two survivors. One by suicide, one by murder.

Now, beneath the gaze of grinning skulls, the terror begins. . . .

Tuesday, June 27th 19:00: The Ordinary Princess

Faerie Maven-Pralou reads MM Kaye’s 2002 novel.

In true fairytale style, the seventh princess is blessed with gifts by a host of fairies, but as her father fears, it goes wrong and one slightly bitter fairy ‘blesses’ her with ordinariness.

So no golden curls, stunning beauty and sublime grace for Princess Amethyst Alexandra Augusta Araminta Adelaide Aurelia Anne. Her dark hair and freckles make Amy (no ordinary princess can be called anything else) stop every suitor from pursuing her. She decides to run away and make her own life, away from boring princes and a confined life.

A life in the forest is bliss, but eventually Amy realises she will need some money, and must find work. So it is that she becomes the fourteenth assistant kitchen maid at a neighbouring palace. And there  – much to everyone’s surprise – she meets a prince just as ordinary (and special) as she is!

Wednesday, June 28th 19:00: The Girl Who Drank the Moon

Caledonia Skytower reads Kelly Barnhill’s 2017 Newbery Medal winner.

Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian.

Xan rescues the abandoned children and deliver them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey.

One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this enmagicked girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own.

To keep young Luna safe from her own unwieldy power, Xan locks her magic deep inside her. When Luna approaches her thirteenth birthday, her magic begins to emerge on schedule–but Xan is far away. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Soon, it is up to Luna to protect those who have protected her–even if it means the end of the loving, safe world she’s always known.

Thursday, June 29th

19:00: Moby-Dick Part 1

“Call me Ishmael.” So begins one of the greatest works of imagination in literary history, Herman Melville’s magnificent Moby-Dick or, The Whale.

As Ishmael is drawn into Captain Ahab’s obsessive quest to slay the white whale Moby-Dick, he finds himself engaged in a metaphysical struggle between good and evil. More than just a novel of adventure, more than a paean to whaling lore and legend, this is a haunting social commentary populated by some of the most enduring characters in literature.

The crew of the Pequod, from stern, Quaker First Mate Starbuck, to the tattooed Polynesian harpooner Queequeg, are a vision of the world in microcosm, the pinnacle of Melville’s lifelong meditation on America.

Written with wonderfully redemptive humour, Moby-Dick is a profound, poetic inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception. Join Shandon Loring as he commences a reading of this magnificent tale.

 

21:00: Seanchai Late Night

Contemporary science fiction with Finn Zeddmore.

 


Please check with the Seanchai Library’s blog for updates and for additions or changes to the week’s schedule.

The featured charity for May through July is Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, raising awareness of childhood cancer causes and funds for research into new treatments and cures.

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5 thoughts on “Seanchai Library Comes to Holly Kai Park

    1. I just repeat the headlines, I don’t create ’em 😀 . George at the Park as well? Going to have to work doubly hard to try and get in-world to make the session!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. You know, coming up with vaguely clever titles for posts and sessions isn’t always straight forward, friend Crap. Imagine me sitting at my desk reviewing the story list, and muttering “Okay,what have we got that could be title-catching, shoes, ships … no sealing wax? DANG!” My pen starts to rattle on the desktop as I try and think cleverly. “What else?, whaaaaaaaat else? ‘Wetness’… there’s a lot of wet here: lakes, ponds, and I am certain George has been wet plenty of times, occasionally behind his ears.” I stop drumming the pen, hoping something better will come along. But it doesn’t. “Okay, that’s it then. Marginal but it will work.”

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