Urban decay in Second Life

Xin; Inara Pey, May 2015, on Flickr Xin (Flickr)

Xin is the home region for the store of the same name, a place I was drawn to it after seeing images by Goizane Latzo. It is one of a number of regions which have taken a theme of disaster / apocalypse as a theme – perhaps the most notable (in terms of bloggers) being Sera Bellic’s The End of the World As We Know it, which I visited last month, although I’ve yet to blog about it.  

In the case of Xin, designed and built be Alice Pvke (although apparently, ” Jaix helped for like nine seconds”! 🙂 ) it’s unclear as to precisely what has happened; the arriving visitor is presented with a town surrounded by mountains, and which is in a state of ruin. High-rise building stand broken or have toppled over to crash into their neighbours, while down below, the streets are slowly decaying, and the local freeway overpass is in a state of collapse.

Xin; Inara Pey, May 2015, on Flickr Xin (Flickr)

Has there been an earthquake or some other natural disaster? Or is the destruction the result of a war or some other man-made catastrophe? Whatever the cause, it would appear it left the local citizens in a state of turmoil; while the streets are now deserted, there are signs of city-wide violence; vehicle sit riddled with bullets, and even one of the city’s fire trucks appears to have been the target of deliberate assault, its once pristine bodywork battered and dented, its windscreens and side windows smashed-in.

Across town sits an old amusement park, the bumper cars sitting pathetically amidst the ruin of their track, while a once proud Ferris wheel lies broken across the street, its cars sitting in a jumbled heap.

Xin; Inara Pey, May 2015, on Flickr Xin (Flickr)

Everything about this town speaks to a once thriving metropolis; now humanity appears to have fled, and slowly, but surely, nature is gradually reclaiming the neighbourhood. Grass, the seeds of which no doubt carried by the wind, has started to lay claim to the flat roofs of some of the smaller buildings, while vines and creepers climb the sides of others, and to spread themselves along the old power lines that connect some of the skyscrapers. The streets themselves are starting to crack and break-up as roots and grass force their way up through ever-widening gaps in the ageing tarmac.

For those seeking an atmospheric backdrop for photos, Xin might provide a useful option – although admittedly, rezzing is disabled. Those looking for the store should take a look underground near the landing point.

Xin; Inara Pey, May 2015, on Flickr Xin (Flickr)

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