The Four Villages in Second Life

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages – click any image for full size

We visited The Four Villages, a full region utilising the full 30K land capacity, early in January 2019, but its taken me a while to document it. Held and designed by Vita (Vita Camino), the region is region is a mix of public and residential parcels within a themed environment that makes for a pleasant visit.

The residential parcels are grouped into four  themed groups, including a beach side area and Mediterranean area, of which more anon. Public areas link these together, offering the means to explore all of then, and with two of them – the beach theme and the Mediterranean  – provide something of a community heart.

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages

The beach area, referred to as the Beach Club, is located to the east side of the region, includes a sandy road that runs from nowhere to nowhere, offering a landing point. While the road may be short and without real start or destination, it has plenty of character waiting to be explored along its short length. It also overlooks the larger of the two waterways to the north, which is home to a small inland  fishing harbour, again rich in character.

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages

The harbour forms a further focal point that includes a small hang-out area atop a raised wooden deck and the Vitas Gardens office. The piers of the harbour effectively block navigation along the length of the river, but they do provide access to the north side of the land. This is home to the two remaining residential areas, respectively New England and Countryside, and both are landscaped in reflection of their names. A hiking trail extends into this area, raising up from the piers to a chapel, before running east and west – but do keep in mind it both runs by and ends at private homes.

Covered bridges run from the beach area’s road over the second river splitting the region and a small pool. They carry visitors to the Mediterranean residential area – called Little Italy. Bordered by private residences, this offers more places to sit and relax, the opportunity to take a swim. Roman bath style.

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages

To ease getting around the region, the Vitas Gardens offices sitting above the mooring piers offers a teleport board to all four of the residential areas, as well as to the principal public area on the region. If you’re looking for a place to rent, check the mailboxes outside of the residential parcels.

Providing care is taken when exploring, The Four Villages offers plenty to see., and provides numerous opportunities for photography, making for a pleasant visit.

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages

The Four Villages; Inara Pey, February 2019, on FlickrThe Four Villages

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People, places and oriental eroticism in Second Life

Liquid Sky: CybeleMoon

There are two very different exhibitions we recently visited. Each is being held within boutique galleries , and both are very different to one another, involving the of work of two very talented Second Life artists.

The first is People and Places, portraits by CybeleMoon, which is presented at the Liquid Sky Gallery, curated by Cassandra Ushimawa. It features, as indicated by the title, the remarkable photography of CybeleMoon (Hana Hoobinoo), featuring some fourteen marvellous photographs of people and places.

Liquid Sky: CybeleMoon

Those who read this blog regularly will know I’m an unabashed admirer of Cybele’s work; as I’ve previously noted, she is without doubt one of the most expressive fantasy artists in Second Life. However, for this exhibition, she presents a series of photographs all of which appear to have been taken in the physical world (although Remains of the Day might have admittedly originated in Second Life).

Predominantly black-and-white, although some are presented in soft tonal colours, and balanced between portraits and landscapes, these are pictures beautifully presented, each with its own story to tell – one or two quite literally, as touching them will offer a note card with an excerpt of a story. The portraits are utterly captivating in their depth of humanity and life, while the landscapes are marvellously evocative; the sheer wild beauty of the Ring of Brodgar is wonderfully caught in Cybele’s photos (see at the top of this article), for example, while Dublin is perfectly framed with Ha’ penny Bridge.

Liquid Sky: CybeleMoon

For its inaugural exhibition, Aggregate Gallery, curated and operated by Brinsen Davis, features an adult-oriented display of art by Megan Prumier, which might be considered NSFW.

Orient Excess also presents fourteen images, all of them avatar studies, the majority semi-nude and focused on the eroticism of milder Japanese shibari / kinbaku rope bondage. As such, this exhibition might not appeal to everyone – but there is no denying the artistic expressionism available with each of the images presented within it, both in terms of the sensuality of the bound figure (whom I presume is Megan), and the overall framing, focus and tonal quality of each image.

Aggregate Gallery: Megan Prumier

The oriental element of exhibition is also contained within the overall setting presented across the two floors of the gallery. These furnishings reflect the Japanese and D/s  / BDSM elements of the exhibition. In fact, they more than reflect: they are a part of it, adding further depth to both the setting and the theme. Shibari  / kinbaku is about aesthetics; thus by incorporating Japanese décor elements into  the exhibition, Megan is providing a further visual aesthetic to her work.

This makes for a fascinating exhibition, one that will remain open through until the end of February 2019.

Aggregate Gallery: Megan Prumier

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