Art in trees and Tiny hosts in Second Life

The 2016 Raglan Shire Art Walk opened on May 15th, and runs through until Sunday, June 19th. One again it is a big affair – at the last count, over 150 Second Life artists and photographers were participating, and free slots within the exhibition spaces were still being filled.

The Art Walk, a traditional event in this delightful Tiny community which is not into its 10th year of life, will be the first opportunity for many to see the new build for the regions as well, this having only been completed in April – and there is a lot to see, quite apart from the extensive Art Walk, making a visit doubly worth while. Given the size of the community and the exhibition, knowing quite where to start can be confusing, so I’m using the Raglan Shire Welcome Centre as the SLurl for this piece.

Also, given the size of the event, getting around can also potentially be a little confusing – or tiring on the feet (particularly if you opt for Tiny form for your visit!). Fortunately, the organisers have recognised this, and brightly coloured teleporter stations are available to carry you directly to each of the regions. There are also touring hedgiepillars you can rez’n’ride at any tour rezzing post.

And, of course, if you’re feeling particularly brave, you can try the local mode of transportation – the catapults which can be found throughout the regions, which will shoot you to a number of destinations (not  all of them related to the Art Walk) with a satisfying “bwong!” as they fire!

As is usual for the Art Walk, the majority of 2D art is in mounted on the hedges found on the tree platforms, while 3D pieces tend to be at ground level. Given the volume of participants, the cross-section of art, both 2D and 3D is enormous, and touring the regions it is easy to come across familiar names (pauses to wave to Bear and Derry) sitting alongside those who are perhaps less familiar on the art circuit, but no less gifted. Whilst touring, it is also likely art lovers will encounter pieces displayed past exhibitions elsewhere. When this happens, tit’s a little like encountering old acquaintances – that warm rush of familiarity on sighting them among the crowd.

For those who enjoy a broad cross-section of SL art, or who are interested in discovering how broad a range of art can be found in Second Life, the Raglan Shire Art Walk is undoubtedly the place to visit – and you’ll always be assured a walk and friendly welcome from the Tinies!

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