Contemplating an Absence of Colour

Absence of Colour
Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts

Art Blue recommended I make time to see a new exhibition which has just opened at the Timamoon Gallery, and which features as it subject … fractal art. Needless to say, I was immediately curious, so when an unexpected free 60 minutes popped-up I hopped over to take a look.

Absence of Colour is a joint exhibit by Milly Sharple and Ranadeep. As the name suggests, this is a presentation of monochrome and greyscale fractal art by the two artists and is, I have to say, stunning; even the setting is a continuance of the overall theme, albeit it with a slight hint of colour.

Absence of Colour, Timamoon Gallery
Absence of Colour, Timamoon Gallery

Spread across three levels, the exhibition space comprises 24 large cubes arranged eight to a level in a square around a communal area. Four cubes open onto this central communal area, and are linked to the remaining four cubes by short tunnels. All of the cubes has at least one element of art displayed within it. The interiors of the cube further reflect the title of the exhibition, alternating between white and black as you walk through them.

The entire arrangement means it as possible to wander between the cubes, crossing back and forth over the communal areas, or to enter one cube and then proceed through each of them in turn to see the displayed pieces before returning to your start point. Teleporters provide the means to move between the three levels.

Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts
Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts

The central level forms the landing point. The cubes here combine pieces by Milly and Ranadeep, while the upper level is devoted to Milly’s work, and the lower to Ranadeep’s. While both artists have used similar software for their work, both employing  Apophysis (although Ranadeep also uses Ultra Fractal and Incendia), their individual styles are apparent in many of the pieces. Ranadeep’s work often features bold lines and linear forms (although not exclusively so), while Milly’s often display more cursive elements and softer lines (although again, these are not exclusive to her pieces).

That all of the pieces have been rendered in black-and-white gives them a remarkable depth; some of the images in the cubes with a black interior have a particular perspective that makes the observer feel they are looking into them, rather than at them, as if they are not pieces of two-dimensional art, but actual constructs located in front of the observer and into which one might climb – or fall. The effect is both captivating and mesmerizing. It is also, while not unexpected given the nature of the art, perhaps far more heady in impact than might be the case had the pieces been rendered in colour.

Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts
Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts

Within each cube, as well, stand figures, male and / or female, apparently studying the pieces on display. These are as much a part of the exhibit as pieces on the walls, seeming to represent each of us as we explore and study, the subtle tones, swirls and lines on their bodies reflective of the impact the art on display has on our own thinking and perception.

This is a quite stunning exhibit, in terms of both the art on display and the manner in which it is presented. It’s not often that one encounters an exhibition where the very space in which it is presented actually forms a part of the overall work, but such appears to be the case here. Even the very subtle use of colour in some of the sofa and seats and on certain walls of the cubes, carries a meaning of their own which adds to the whole.

Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts
Absence of Colour, Timamoon Arts

Definitely not one to miss. Highly recommended.

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