A Rusted Farm in Second Life

Rusted Farm

Rusted Farm, the latest installation by Terrygold, open on July 6th, 2018. With it, Terrygold leans towards an ecological theme.

Visitors arrive in a tunnel  – actually a drain which might otherwise act as a run off for rain water – where a series of information boards provide notes on preferred viewer settings and provide background notes framing the piece, all of which should be read: just touch the flags below the images to have the notes delivered in text in either English or Italian.

Oil pollution: it’s a contamination of the environment (soil, air and above all water) caused by all kinds of liquid hydrocarbons, i.e. from crude oil or its derivatives. Oil pollution can be systematic or accidental … Systematic or chronic pollution is often much more serious than accidental one. The lumps of tar deposited on the beaches in the seaside resorts derive mostly from the residues contained in the ballast water discharged into the sea.

– Extract from the Rusted Farm introductory notes

Rusted Farm

At the end of this tunnel is a ladder offering the way up out of the drain. To reach it, visitors gain the first hints of the direction in which Terrygold is taking the piece: strange-looking fish circle, watched over by equally curious bugs hovering overhead. At first appearing to be mechanical in nature, it takes a while to realise they might actually  be made up of waste material – rusting metal, discarded bulbs, with dorsal fins looking like deformed plastic six-pack rings, and so on. Beyond these, barrels leak oil into the drain.

The “ground” level, reached via a ladder placed beyond the fish and barrels, is a large field of sun-ripened wheat over which more bizarre creatures stand or fly. Birds look more like drones; ants and spiders again looking as if they are made up of waste and rubbish. Great spherical tanks with spigots are raised on spindly legs or set into the great wall of a building, apparently dripping water onto the field of wheat, giving it life.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also described as the Pacific Trash Vortex, is a gyre of marine debris particles (mostly plastic) in the central North Pacific Ocean. It’s located roughly between 135°W to 155°W and 35°N to 42°N.

Extract from the Rusted Farm introductory notes (from wikipedia)

Rusted Farm

It is a bizarre scene, the field also crossed by pipes and other drains, raised above the crop as if ready to receive liquids. Nevertheless it is one, with the backdrop of a setting sun, seems innocuous outside of the initial framing of the information boards. Looking at the strange ants, birds and spider, it’s easy to put it all down to artistic licence.

However, dominating all of this is the flank of that huge building, in which a tiny door sits, reached by climbing one of the pipes and then walking along it. Opening this door and touching the blank wall beyond it to activate a teleport, reveals the truth of matters. Giant pipes sit within the walls of this building, rusted, ugly and dripping huge gobs of brown liquid – oil waste, contaminated water, take your pick as to what it might be; the key point is at least some of it is being delivered to collection drains which then carry it away and into the soil being used to grow the wheat.

Thus it is that we have the complete picture: fish, birds, insects a metaphor for the waste products we’re dumping into the world’s oceans, burying in landfills, and so on; the pipes and liquid waste a reminder of the waste products we let contaminate the land and which, ultimately, enter our food chain (as represented by the wheat). And it is apt that among the bizarre creatures we find in Rusted Farm Terrygold has included a deep ocean angler fish, highlighting the fact that while we tend to point to things like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (estimated to possibly range between  700,000 sq km / 270,000 sq mi and 15,000,000 sq km / 5,800,000 sq mi in area – that’s between Texas and Russia in size), the impact of plastic pollution on the sea floor / deep ocean is still largely unknown.

Rusted Farm

A possibly dark installation in theme, but one intended to prick the conscience, Rusted Farm is also a curious mix. Despite the underpinning message, when taken on its own, the wheat field with its strangely crafted insects and birds is from some angles almost a garden of sculptures ready to be appreciated in their own right.

SLurl Details

Advertisements

At The Bridge with Terrygold in Second Life

The Bridge
The Bridge

Running from 13:00 SLT on Wednesday, December 21st through until January 6th at Art on Roofs, is The Bridge by Terrygold, an exhibition of over 40 of her images and studies in what I think is the largest display of her work to date.

Anyone familiar with Terrygold’s work, cannot help but be struck by her expressive use of monochrome, her minimal and striking use of colour and the manner in which props form an integral part of her images and the narratives they project. Seeing so many pieces on display here, complete with thematic groupings, really brings the extraordinary power and beauty of her work home.

The Bridge
The Bridge

As with her previous exhibits, The Bridge is reached via teleport from the main Art on Roofs landing point. On arrival, some viewer set-up may be required prior to entering the exhibition areas. Specifically, the time of day should be set to ambient dark / midnight, and the graphics Advanced Lighting Model (ALM) should be turned on to appreciate the projected lights (there is no need to enabled shadows Sun/Moon + Projected Lights if this hits your performance too hard – the light projectors will still work, you’ll just use the use of shadows to further enhance the pieces).

Once your viewer is set, step out in the white area and onto the bridge. This leads the way between six tall alcoves in which are displayed the first of Terrygold’s pieces – including one of the props used in a study. This bridge is the first indication that as with previous exhibitions, the setting in which Terrygold displays her work is not just a backdrop to her work, it is very much part of the exhibition itself – as there the props she’s used, which is why they can be found within The Bridge.

The Bridge
The Bridge

On reaching the far end of the bridge, visitors are invited to pass between blood-red curtains (red being one of the colours Terrygold frequently uses to present strong contrasts in her work) to the second element of the exhibition. Here amidst echoes of her earlier installation, Windows (which you can read about here), are four pieces with a distinctly musical theme. Beyond this, reached by following a jigsaw on the floor, lay the main two exhibit areas.

The first of these offers another three-dimensional experience to visitors – a theme continued from the settings for earlier displays – with the art extending below “floor” level. A white path winds through this chamber, passing an ivory piano while offering a vantage point for camming around the art and the hall, before leading the visitor through a gap in the walls to the final, midnight black chamber. Here are themed sets of beautiful monochrome nude studies. With titles such as Gabbia, (“Cage”), Prigioniera (“Prisoner”),  Freni (“Brakes”), and Muri Stella (“Wall Star”), they are stunningly evocative and powerful pieces which hold sway over one’s attention.

The Bridge
The Bridge

Terrygold modestly claims she is not an artist, just a photographer. I have, and continue to, disagree with her on this. Not only do her images demonstrate a clear eye for framing, composition and narrative, the environments in which she presents them more than demonstrate her considerable skill as an artist and designer.

The Bridge, as noted, will remain open through until January 6th, 2017. Should you visit, please do consider a donation towards Terrygold’s work and the upkeep of the Art on Roofs gallery spaces, of which she is also the curator.

SLurl Details

Terrygold’s Windows in Second Life

Windows
Windows

Windows is the title of a new exhibition by Italian artist Terrygold, which opens at 13:00 SLT on Monday, June 20th. Located high above the Solo Donna club, home to the Art on Roofs exhibitions (use the teleport board from here to reach the exhibition proper), Windows is another series of Terrygold’s compelling avatar studies, some of which are set within sash window frames, indicating one aspect of the exhibition’s title.

To enjoy the exhibit the most, it is advisable to set your viewer to Ambient Dark (or a similar windlight) on arrival, and also make sure ALM is enabled so you get the full benefit of the projected lights. Instructions on how to do this are provided for Firestorm users at the arrival point, which also contains the first three images in the display.

Windows
Windows

Once your viewer is set, Step on to the brick path. Bordered on either side by hedges, this takes you past four further nude images of the artist. The two on the left feature her standing behind an open window and on a window ledge; both are intimate portraits, casting the onlooker into the role of photographer or lover. The two images on the right present her standing before part of a much larger set – one which the brick path directs you towards.

Here street lamps light the way to the façade of a gaily painted town house, sitting at the end of a “street” whilst window-fronted boxes hand in the dark sky around and over you as you make your way to the entrance to the house, within which sit 17 further new works.

Windows
Windows

The Windows theme takes a slight different here; the images are absent any sign of sash windows, being instead transformed into windows in their own right, each one providing us with just a glimpse of a story within it, or framing a moment in time. Throughout all of them is Terrygold’s trademark use of black and white with just a hint of colour – noticeably red – to capture our attention.

The stories offer here are many in form. Some of this images suggest purely artistic nuances, other sway towards the sensual, while some are openly erotic. Tacchi Cherry (literally “Cherry Heels”, seen above, left) is actually quite startling in the charged eroticism it carries; while alongside of it, Orologio (Clock) is equally startling in its layered meaning of our relationship with time – and its mastery over us.

Windows
Windows

Available to buy, each of the images here is bound to catch your attention, marking this as another superb exhibit  by and outstanding photographer. Windows formally opens at 13:00 SLT, as noted above, and will remain open through until Sunday, July 10th. Recommended.

SLurl Details

Red – Girls – Hot – Fruit in Second Life

Art on Roofs: RED - GIRLS - HOT - FRUIT
Art on Roofs: RED – GIRLS – HOT – FRUIT

RED – GIRLS – HOT – FRUIT is the latest exhibition to open at the Art on Roofs gallery curated by Terrygold. It presents a series of distinctive watercolours by LeMelonRouge (better known in the physical world as Spanish artist Francesc Palomas), balanced between images of females (mostly nude) and images of fruits, all painted using a palette biased towards red and the warmer colours associated with it.

Red is often associated with passion / the erotic – we so often refer to the “heat of passion” – and several of the nude images reflect this, albeit with a slant towards the erotic, given hand placement. Others are more gentle in both tone and colour, suggesting restfulness; whether this is innocent sleep perhaps the “post-coital glow”, is for the viewer to decide.

Art on Roofs: RED - GIRLS - HOT - FRUIT
Art on Roofs: RED – GIRLS – HOT – FRUIT

There is another emotion we associate with red as well – anger; and this is also visible in some of the images certainly also visible here, through what appears to be a cry of anguish in “Alone 3” (above right) or distress (“Alone 2”, not pictured here).

Whether intentional or not, both of these images – “Alone 3” and “Alone 2”  – seem to also depict acts of violence. Taken as a whole, the pose and red splashes to one side of the head suggest  the moment after a heavy blow has been struck. Similarly, the red marks across the subject’s back in “Alone 2” might be taken as welts of received blows.

Art on Roofs: RED - GIRLS - HOT - FRUIT
Art on Roofs: RED – GIRLS – HOT – FRUIT

Contrasting with the dynamic imagery of the nudes, the painting of the fruits  – while in places suggestive of passion and heat (cherries and chilli peppers) – come across as havens of freshness and health (pumpkin and tomatoes), forming a soft contrast to the human figures whilst also offering a subtle reflection of the emotions displayed within them.

When taken as a whole, RED – GIRLS – HOT – FRUIT is a complex series of images in which more may be going on both within the images themselves and in their placement in pairs, requiring considered evaluation. The exhibit will remain open through until May 8th.

SLurl Details

Terrygold’s Black Box in Second Life

Back Box
Black Box

Black Box is the title of a new exhibition by Italian artist Terrygold, which opened on Sunday, March 13th, 2016. Located high above the Solo Donna club, home to the Art on Roofs series, Black Box is a compelling series, further enhancing Terrygold’s reputation as an artist with a considered eye for composition, nuance, framing and narrative in her work.

Following on from Ceramic Dolls (reviewed here) and Onirica (reviewed here), Black Box shares some aspects with the previous exhibitions, notably Onirica, whilst presenting new images and models, with the exhibition space itself very much as part of the overall installation in tone and form.

Back Box
Black Box

To appreciate Black Box in its fullest, it is essential you have Advanced Lighting Model (ALM) enabled through your graphics preferences. It is not required that you have Shadows enabled as well (which tends to be the heavy hitter when it comes to performance degradation); but as the exhibition space makes use of projected lights, ALM really is essential in order to gain the deepest exposure to the exhibit. Ambient Dark is also the recommended windlight setting.

As with Onirica, the visitor is led through a series of rooms (initially by a blue line on the floor), each of which offers 2D or 3D art (or a mix of both) created by Terrygold, finely lit using projectors, and each piece evocative in its own right. As with Onirica, elements of the exhibition space also form backdrops or elements within some of the images displayed, making for something of an almost recursive experience when appreciating those images. Also like Onirica, passage from one room to the next is, on a couple of occasions, through an element of the displayed art, again adding depth to the exhibition.

Black Box
Black Box

With her work, Terrygold always presents a fine eye towards the use of black and white and the inclusion of colour. This was much in evidence in both Ceramic Dolls and Onirica, and is so again with Black Box; and if anything the subtle ebb and flow of colour through the images brings an additional vibrancy to the pieces displayed here, whilst presenting Black Box almost as the third part or a continuing chapter in a series which perhaps commenced with Ceramic Dolls.

As well as ensuring you have ALM and a suitable windlight when viewing Black Box, be sure to came around carefully –   there are places where you’ll need to cam up to catch everything.

Back Box
Black Box

All told, Black Box is another exquisite blending of 2D and 3D and environment,  one which comes highly recommended, and which will remain open through until Sunday, April 3rd.

SLurl Details

Terrygold’s visions in Second Life

Onirica - +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+
Onirica – +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+

Onirica, literally meaning “dream”, is the latest exhibition to be hosted at the +Black Label Exhibition Corner+. It features the work of Italian artist Terrygold, who also curates the Art on Roofs exhibition space at Solo Donna.

It was at Solo Donna that I first became acquainted with Terrygold’s remarkable images, during her exhibition Ceramic Dolls, which I reviewed here. At the time I was struck by the exquisite beauty of her avatar studies, and I’m pleased to say that Onirica continues in a similar vein, further illustrating her skill and artistry with design, composition and imagery.

Onirica - +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+
Onirica – +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+

The majority of art is displayed with two rooms of an exhibit space which itself forms an overall part of Onirica, and which perhaps suggests different states of vision.

In the first – which forms the arrival point – is bathed in turquoise light and features 11 pieces arranged along two walls of a room bearing a subtle hint of science-fiction about it.  Most of the pieces here are in colour, and feature Terrygold herself as the model. Two of the pieces, locating among the six lining one wall, carry an echo of Ceramic Dolls, offering something of a link between the two exhibitions, whilst two others have clearly been composed within the Onirica spaces, as is one of the pieces on the facing wall.

Onirica - +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+
Onirica – +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+

This room also features a sixth image, framed and hanging at the far end, relative to the landing point. This presents a dramatic study of a nude Terrygold standing within a room pock-marked with dimples in the floor, into which frozen drops of liquid appear to be falling, trailing long strands behind them, which disappear into the darkness overhead.

An arrow on the floor invites you to step through the picture. Doing so leads you into this room of drops, the turquoise space you have just left now framed on the wall behind you, suggesting a move from one state of dreaming to another. A single framed image lies in front of you, a further arrow inviting you to step through it. But before you do, be sure to try the poseball floating amidst the frozen drops, and become a part of Terrygold’s art yourself.

Onirica - +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+
Onirica – +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+

The third room contains a large colourful mobile surrounded by 16 further images spaced around the walls, the majority in black and white.  Some of these images again carry faint echoes of Ceramic Dolls, featuring as they a porcelain-like Terrygold. At the same time the images here are all quite individual, standing distinct from her earlier exhibition, each of them an evocative study guaranteed to capture and hold one’s attention.

Terrygold describes herself as “a builder, interested in art”. I think she is being too modest. Onirica demonstrates that in both her images and her designs, Terrygold is very much an artist first and foremost; the blending of setting and pictures within this exhibition is simply exquisite.

Onirica - +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+
Onirica – +Black Label Exhibitions Corner+

Onirica remains open through until Friday, February 12th, and is not to be missed.

SLurl Details