Tag Archives: Art in SL

A Bloom-ing Evolution

Artist Evolution

Artist Evolution – Renaissance Gallery

“When I started in Second Life, I’d never worked in digital art, and photography for me in either world was a mystery.  When a friend mentioned I might enjoy this activity in Second Life, I laughed at him.  I am the person with the shaky, blurry picture in RL photos, even with an automatic zoom. Slowly and tentatively I started trying to be artistic with pictures, which were of course initially hideous.  I became obsessed with the effort.”

So open the introductory notes Molly Bloom has provided for the latest exhibition of her work, which opens at the Renaissance Gallery, curated by JolieElle Parfort, which officially opens on Monday, July 27th.

Artist Evolution

Artist Evolution – Renaissance Gallery

Entitled Artist Evolution,  the exhibit offers an examination of Molly’s SL art as it has evolved together with her mastery of the many composite elements that go into her work. As such it is a fascinating piece, not only for those who – like me – enjoy Molly’s work immensely, but for anyone interested in how an artist develops their eye, style, skill and artistry.

The pieces on display present the visitor with something of a historical look at Molly’s work as it has evolved, from her first “flat” snapshot (seen on the left wall as one enters the gallery), and progressing through her learning to build sets and make poses, discovering the power of lighting and lighting tools, to the influence of physical world art on her digital work as a result of her studies as an art history student.

Artist Evolution

Artist Evolution – Renaissance Gallery

“[I] have always been fascinated with Chiaroscuro, or the use of strong contrasts of dark and light.  Artists Raphael, Caravaggio, Rubens and a host of others from the 15th Century are known for this technique,” Molly says.  “My first very serious work was a reproduction of this lighting technique set in a classical style [shown in the headline image for this review, and in more detail directly above, left] … That lighting technique became my signature.  From there I started playing with adding 3D elements to my work …”

…And thus we come to Molly’s stunning 3D art pieces which have so delighted audiences in Second Life wherever they’ve been displayed, and which I’ve previously covered in the pages of this blog when reviewing exhibitions such as Brain-Gasm, Rock’n’Roll, and Depth Perception.

Artist Evolution

Artist Evolution – Renaissance Gallery

The evolution of style and content is clear through the pieces displayed. But more than that, this exhibit also reveals more about the artist herself; through the works displayed here, we also catch a sight of her drive, her determination to master new techniques, to expand her own abilities and her range of creative expression. There’s a joy in art to be witnessed here that underlines the fact that this is both an insightful and delightful exhibition; one not to be missed.

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Windlight Magazine: Return to the Beach Photography Contest L$10k prize pool

WindlightTo mark the passing of the summer months, Windlight magazine has launched its first annual Return to the Beach photography competition.

“We are nearing the end of summer and we know that you would want to capture those special beach moments in Second Life”, said John (Johannes1977 Resident) Windlight’s founder and editor, in announcing the competition.

He continued, “select a beach in Second Life. If you are stumped where to find beaches, try the destinations guide: http://secondlife.com/destinations/beaches. Once you choose your beach or beaches, start snapping!”

On offer is a prize pool totalling L$10,000, together with some special extras:

  • 1st Place – L$5,000, 1 double page advertisement and a magazine article, plus a blog article
  • 2nd Place – L$3000, 1 double page advertisement and a blog article
  • 3rd Place – L$2000, 1 double page advertisement.

All entries should be posted in the Windlight Magazine Flickr group, and entrants are allowed 3 submissions total. In addition, the following guidelines should be observed:

  • When posting your photos please use the following naming convention: Windlight Magazine-Beach Photo Contest – SL Name-Photo #1, (or #2 or #3 for additional entries)
  • All photos must:
    • Be your original work, and must not have been posted elsewhere on Flickr or used elsewhere previously
    • Must include the SLurl of the beach where they were taken
  • Nudity is allowed if done in a non pornographic and non sexual way
  • Post-processing using external tools is permitted.
Jodi and I enjoy some beach-side relaxation at Timeless Memories. Where will your entries for the Windlight Magazine photo contest take you?

Jodi and I enjoy some beach-side relaxation at Timeless Memories. Where will your entries for the Windlight Magazine photo contest take you?

Please be respectful of region covenants and rules when visiting beaches, estates, or any location in Second Life, and ensure permission is granted for the taking of photographs.

Deadlines and Judging

  • Photos must be uploaded to the Windlight Magazine Flickr group no later than the end of Saturday, August 15th, 2015
  • Judging will be by an invited panel, who will assess entries on the following criteria:  creativity, originality, technique and the incorporation of the location in the photograph.
  • Winners will be announced on Thursday, August 20th, via the Windlight Magazine website and on the Windlight social media channels. All winners will be contacted in Second Life and via Flickr messaging.

So – if you haven’t already done so, it’s time to get down to the beach and start snapping! Good luck to all who enter!

A little Série Noire in Second Life

Tutsy Navarathna is perhaps best known for his brilliant and evocative videos. However, he is also an accomplished photographer, demonstrating the same flair and eye for scenes and story-telling in his images that is so clearly evident in his machinima.

His latest exhibition of photography recently opened at the Nitroglobus Gallery, operated and curated by the partnership of Nitro Fireguard and Dido Haas. And it is a must-see.

Série Noire is an homage (I’m using the French pronunciation intentionally), to the publishing imprint of the same name, founded in 1945 by French screenwriter and actor Marcel Duhamel. It’s a title which became – and still is – synonymous with detective fiction; so much so, that in 1946 it led to the coining of the term film noir to describe those stylish Hollywood detective dramas of the 1940s / 1950s.

The exhibition offers a series of large format images featuring scenes which might easily have been drawn from any of the stories to be found in Serie Noir during its 70-year history. Thus it is that we have images alive with sensual femme fatales and fedora-hatted detectives mixed with those hinting at outright sexuality and bordered by the suggestion of the harder, more edged violence we expect from our detective thrillers today. although that said, I have to admit to liking the picture that is so suggestive of a more genteel era of detective fiction, complete with a bowler-hatted, monocled detective, a walking cane held in one hand and a faint air of the Hercule Poirots about him.

Also forming a part of the exhibition is a series of sculptures by Nitro Fireguard. These present further scenes so often found in crime and detective fiction, and each is framed under the light of a street lamp. Most are static, but one features an animated couple caught in the moment of a shooting. But is in premeditated murder or a case of crime passionnel?

I have long been a fan of Tutsy’s video work, and each time I see his photography, I become more enamoured of it as well; Série Noire further cements that feeling, and I recommend it to anyone with a love of detective fiction and films. When visiting, do take the opportunity to explore the other gallery areas, which feature more works by Dido and Nitro.

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Art is Protest

Art is Protest: Staten Island, July 17th 2014, Nino Vichan

Art is Protest: Staten Island, July 17th 2014, Nino Vichan

In Art is Protest, open now at Rubin Mayo’s Trésor de l’Art, we are invited to view exhibits by SL artist Nino Vichan and RL artist Basu Kshitiz.

Nino’s installation, reached via a large entryway to one side of the landing area, entitled Staten Island, July 17th 2014, is an examination of the events of July 17th, 2014, in which African American Eric Garner met his death at the hands of officers from the New York City Police Department, and the events which followed in the wake of his death.

Art is Protest: Staten Island, July 17th 2014, Nino Vichan

Art is Protest: Staten Island, July 17th 2014, Nino Vichan

The installation is presented in a 3-part narrative. I Can’t Breathe (a reference to a phrase repeatedly uttered by Eric Garner), presents  the events of July 17th, 2014, and the death of Mr. Garner. Black Lives Matter recalls the widespread civil unrest which occurred across the United States in late 2014 after a grand jury decided not to indict Daniel Pantaleo, the officer perhaps most directly involved in Mr. Garner’s death. Finally, Violence Begets Violence causes us to reflect upon the events of December 20th, 2014,  when Ismaaiyl Abdullah Brinsley shot and killed Brooklyn police officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Lui as a direct response to Mr, Garner’s death and the Ferguson, Missouri, police shooting of Michael Brown on August 9th, 2014. Brinsley himself then committed suicide.

This is perhaps not the most comfortable of installations to visit – but that’s precisely the point; in marking the anniversary of an event which still has repercussions today, Nino is challenging us not only to revisit and consider the matters of Mr. Garner’s death and the events which then followed, but also to question the issue of violence as a whole.

Art is Protest:  Basu Kshitiz

Art is Protest: Basu Kshitiz

The route through the three scenes of Staten Island, July 17th 2014 will return you to the landing area, which features a display of work by artist and political commentator Basu Kshitiz.

Nepal is a country riven not only by earthquakes, as we so recently witnessed, but also by extreme poverty (it is 145th of 187 countries on the Human Development Index) and much more besides. Since the end of the decade-long civil war in 2008, the country has also been in a state of political turmoil, with rampant corruption in both government and business.

Art is Protest: Basu Kshitiz

Art is Protest: Basu Kshitiz

Basu’s work, which appears in annapurapost.com, the on-line portal for the Annapura Post, a daily newspaper in Nepali language, seeks to drawn attention to political corruption and social injustices which continue to deny many in his country with the basic essentials of water, healthcare, education and energy.

Art is Protest will remain open through to September.

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